10 Tips on Weaving Transparencies on a Rigid Heddle Loom

 

detail-of-transparency

Handwoven transparencies are related to tapestries in that you can weave intricate pictorial designs with both techniques. Transparencies are lighter weight, with inlaid patterning on a sheer plain weave background. Two wefts are required: a background weft which weaves selvedge to selvedge and a pattern weft that weaves the pattern or design. The background is open while the pattern areas dense. Transparencies are at their best when hung in a sunny window where they can catch the light much like stained glass.

This article focuses on weaving a transparency on a Flip or Cricket loom. I wanted to share these tips because someone recently told me that you can’t weave transparencies on a rigid heddle loom. In my experience it is quite possible on the Schacht Flip and Cricket Looms. Here are some of my discoveries I’ve made through the years.

Transparency in progress.

  1. Be sure to wind the warp very evenly on your warping board. This will help achieve even tension.
  2. Use poster board for the packing paper (regular poster board that you would find at a hobby store—about the weight of card stock); this will help achieve a firmer surface with an inelastic linen warp.
  3. Beam onto the back beam very tightly, stopping and pulling small sections across the warp with every few rotations of the beam.
  4. Both the Flip and Cricket looms are great for holding the shed open as you do the inlay.
  5. I use 16/2 linen set at 12 epi for the warp and 16/2 or 20/2 linen for the background weft. For inlay yarns, I use three strands of 20/2 Mora wool or 20/2 Epic wool wound together into small butterflies. This way, I can mix colors similar in value to get just the shade/hue I want.
  6. Double the outside selvedge threads.
  7. One of the problems when weaving with linen, which has little give, is that the slot threads are a bit slack when in an up-shed or down-shed. To correct this, I use what I call a tension stick. On the Flip Loom, I use the Schacht Wolf apron bars for this. They are about ¾” thick, and I like them to be about 2-3” wider than my warp width. I insert this in the shed and turn it on edge at the back (behind the heddle) of the loom, as shown in the photo below. While weaving, I turn the stick on its edge for a nice tight warp (this tightens the slot threads that are usually slack whenever the heddle is up or down). When you need to advance the woven fabric and release the ratchet dogs, simply turn the stick to its thinner side, laying it flat. Then remember to turn the stick back again when you are ready to weave. On the Cricket Loom, I use a Cricket stick shuttle for the tension stick and place it in a different location than I use on the Flip. I insert a Cricket stick shuttle into the shed behind the reed, then loosen the warp a whole lot in order to slide the stick shuttle around the back beam where it rests between the back beam and warp beam. As with the Flip, turn the stick on edge to tighten the slot threads.
  8. When weaving a transparency, I use a cartoon on the underside of the warp. I find I need to get up really close to be able to see down through the warp to my cartoon below. If I’m using a Flip Trap, I can’t get close enough when weaving transparency, so I tie some small plastic baskets on the two sides to hold my shuttle.
  9. You may find that after weaving a few inches, the selvedge threads tend to loosen (especially if there is draw-in). To give these threads a little extra tension at the back of the loom, I tie a piece of carpet warp or strong string around the doubled selvedge warps and hang a weight on them (see photo above).
  10. Weave with the warp as tight as possible while still being able to raise the heddle to the upper position. To tighten the warp adequately, place the heddle in the neutral position and be sure that the tension stick is in the flat position. After tightening the warp, check to see if you can still raise the heddle to the upper position. If you can’t, back the tension off one notch until you can raise the heddle. While weaving, the stick should be turned on edge which makes the slot threads tighter.

With these tips, you can weave beautiful linen transparencies with pleasure.

Over view of Butterfly transparency

Lynette Glass

About 12 years ago Lynette Glass started weaving after her husband constructed a small frame loom following instructions in a library book. She didn't finish the first project on it, finding the process too slow. Still wanting to weave, she found a used Schacht rigid heddle loom which she propped on the edge of her dining room table and wove a set of placemats. She was hooked on weaving and soon graduated to a Schacht floor loom. She then discovered Doramay Keasbey's book, Sheer Delight - Handwoven Transparencies, and from this found her passion for weaving transparencies. Lynette Glass teaches in her studio, The Weaver’s Cottage, in Amity, Arkansas.

DIY Zoom Loom Holiday Flower Lights

A few years ago we collaborated with Interweave to create a project for the “DIY Holiday” special issue. We are thrilled share this project with you now as we head into 2017.

The Schacht Team pulled together to create another community project, with each of us choosing a color of embroidery floss and weaving a number of squares in that color. The resulting project can be easily customized for the holidays or any color scheme you prefer. The options are endless!

beauty-shot

Holiday Flower Lights

Designed by Benjamin Krudwig – Woven by the Schacht Team

Equipment: Schacht Zoom Loom and 6″ weaving needle.

Yarns: Two 27 yard skeins each of size 5 DMC embroidery floss in the following colors: Snow White, Medium Blue Violet, Rose, Coral, Peacock, Medium Forest Green.

supplies

Accessories: LED light string (be careful not to use any other variety as the heat could create a fire hazard).

Weaving: Weave enough squares to cover each of your LED light bulbs. The string we used had 30 lights, so we wove five squares in each of the 6 colors. Depending on your color scheme and number of lights, you may need more yardage of embroidery floss.

Assembly: Make each square into a flower using the detailed instructions below, and start attaching them to the string lights. Push the LED bulb through the center of the flower, tie the excess threads (from pulling) around the string light. Secure with a little super glue or a dab of hot glue. You can click on each picture to make it larger.

Repeat this process until all of the lights are covered.

Plug in and enjoy!

If you make this project, share it with us on Instagram and tag your post with #SchachtSpindle and #ZoomLoom.

 

Learn something new in the New Year!Creative Weaving Techniques on the Rigid Heddle Loom with Jane Patrick

If you’ve mastered the Zoom Loom and want to expand your weaving horizons, try rigid heddle weaving!

Creative Weaving Techniques on the Rigid Heddle Loom is full of finger controlled and pick-up techniques to help you create stunning projects with lots of texture and visual interest!

Here’s the class overview from Craftsy!

“Turn your fabric dreams into woven realities with longtime weaving instructor Jane Patrick! During class, Jane will teach you versatile methods that open up new design possibilities for weaving on a rigid heddle loom. You’ll start with skills for stripes, open-weave fabrics and brilliant textures. Then, go beyond the grid to create curves and more, as Jane guides you through working with deflection, pulled threads and differential shrinkage. Want to take the fuss out of working with finer yarns? You’ll discover techniques for working with two heddles at a finer sett. Plus, you’ll end class with fun double-weaving techniques you can use for more complex, layered fabrics that look different on either side.”

Select courses on Craftsy from Jane Patrick are 33% off until March 14, 2017 when you use this link. This cannot be combined with any other coupons.

Schacht Spindle

Schacht Spindle Company has been producing hand-crafted weaving and spinning equipment in Boulder, CO since 1969. We are committed to producing the tools for the crafts we love.

Three Easy Weaving Projects for the 20″ Flip Loom – Mountain Meadow Wools Collaboration

For this month’s yarn collaboration, we worked with Mountain Meadow Yarns. Their rustic, American grown and milled yarn paired perfectly with the Schacht Flip Loom. All three of the following projects can be made with the 20″ model of Flip. The rise of small looms continues, and you can create stunning woven pieces in very little time, with nothing more than plain weave and some stunning yarn. If you make any of these projects or other woven projects with Mountain Meadow Yarns, tag them on Instagram with the hashtag #MountainMeadowWeaves.

Houndstooth Pillow

Houndstooth Piullow

Equipment: 20″ Flip Loom with a 5-dent reed

Yarn: 2 skeins of Sheridan in Medium Grey (102 yards per skein) and 2 skeins of Sheridan in Geranium (102 yards per skein)

Other Notions: 16″ pillow form

Warp: 2 yards long, 18″ wide in reed

Warping: Using the direct, peg warping method, alternate colors in each slot while warping. That is, sley all of the Grey yarns first, threading a slot, skipping a slot and so on. After all of the Grey yarns are threaded, fill in the empty slots with Geranium. Wind the warp onto the back beam and then thread the adjacent holes. Your color order will be 2 Grey, 2 Geranium, repeat.

Weaving: Alternate 2 ends of Grey and 2 ends of Geranium, repeat, just as you did in the warp. Weave a balanced weave which means that you will see a square space (not a rectangle space or lack of space) between the intersection of the warp and weft threads. This will ensure that the houndstooth pattern will be balanced warp-wise and weft-wise.

Finishing: To secure the weft for washing, knot the warp yarns in groups of 4 on both ends of the weaving. Wash in hot water with soap, rinse  in cool water with a 1/2 cup of vinegar, and then rinse in clean water for 15 minute each. Put the fabric in the dryer with a few towels on medium heat for 15 minutes, checking frequently. Lay flat to dry.

To make the pillow: Wrap the fabric around the 16”x16” square pillow form. To measure, start with a knotted end and place it in the middle of the pillow. Then wrap the fabric all the way around the pillow form, past the knotted end and to the edge of the pillow form (like an envelope). Mark this end at the edge of the pillow and sew a couple of zigzag lines across at this point. (You can also serge this line.) Turn over the zigzag end and hand sew a 1/2″ hem. Lay the fabric flat with the right wide up (hem down) and fold it in an envelope with the knotted side first and the right side of the hem meeting the edge of the pillow. Single crochet or stitch up the sides and turn right side out.

 

Forest Wrap

green wrap

 

Equipment: 20″ Flip with a 5-dent reed.

Yarn: Laramie, 1 skein of Forest variegated and 1 skein- of Grass semi solid.

Warp: 130″ of Forest variegated, 20″ wide.

Warping: Using the direct peg warping method, sley some slots and leave others open in a random manner in this way: s2 o3 s1 o2 s2 o3 s1 o1 s1 o2 s2 o3 s1 o1 s1 o2 s2 o3 s2 o2 s1 o1 s1 o2 s2 o2 s1 o2 s2. Note: s= sley, o=open, as in s2= sley two slots, o3=leave 3 slots unthreaded, and so on.

swatch
This has been rotated to the warp is vertical and the weft is horizontal.

Weaving: Using Grass weave 8 picks of balanced weave, then leave one inch open or unwoven (you can use a thin cardboard as a spacer across the warp if you find that helpful, removing it after the next 8 picks are woven). Alternate in this manner for the entire length of the warp.

Finishing: Remove from the loom and secure the ends by tying the warp threads in groups of 4. Wash the fabric in the washing machine with detergent on warm with on a short cycle, checking often so as to not over full. Place the fabric in the dryer with a bath towel for 30 minutes on medium heat, checking the fabric every 5 minutes or so. Tighten any loose knots and cut off the excess warp near the knot.

 

Salmon Scarf

salmon scarf

 

Equipment: 20” Flip with an 8-dent reed

Yarn: Salem, 2 skeins of scarlet.

Warp: 103″ long, 18 1/2″ wide.

Warping: Using the direct peg warping method, thread the first 2 slots then thereafter skip every other slot in the reed with ending with 2 threaded slots on the other edge.

Weaving: Weave in loosely in plain weave at about 6 picks per inch.

salmon swatch

Finishing: Remove the fabric from the loom and secure the ends by tying groups of 4 warp threads. Wash the fabric on a warm, short cycle with detergent, checking the fabric often. Place the fabric in the dryer with a towel and dry on medium for about 30 minutes, checking often.

Denise Renee Grace

Denise Renee Grace first learned to weave as a student at Bethel College. She later moved to Boulder and worked in a re-purposed product company where Barry Schacht discovered her and hired her to work in our sales and service department. Denise’s first love is spinning and she is especially fond of working with natural fibers on all four of her Schacht Wheels. When it comes to weaving, tabby tickles her. In charge of customer care, Denise spends her days here helping people—something she does so well.

Summer and Winter – Melissa Ludden Hankens

sampler

A long time ago, in a lifetime that seems far, far away, I took a beginning 4-shaft weaving class at Shuttles, Spindles and Skeins in Boulder, Colorado. I was smitten with weaving from day one, but even more so after the summer & winter lesson. It appealed to me aesthetically, and the resulting cloth was durable and reversible with no long weft floats.

Some seem to feel the origin of the weave is uncertain. Marguerite Porter Davison suggests that its origin is Finland, with many fine coverlet examples later found in Pennsylvania Dutch country here in the U.S. Origin aside, the cloth, being reversible, is traditionally woven on a light warp with a dark pattern thread used in the weft. The resulting cloth has a distinctly light side and a distinctly dark side—the light side meant for the summer months and the dark side for the winter. That said, to achieve this using two blocks, the number of blocks available to you if you are using a 4-shaft loom, you will need to weave a larger volume of one block than the other to create the color differences from one side to the other. You will see that not all of my samples achieve this.

Let’s focus on weaving summer & winter on a 4-shaft loom. To weave traditional summer & winter, you will need two shuttles and two colors of yarn – a blue pattern yarn and a white warp/tabby are traditional, but certainly not a requirement. I would suggest choosing one light and one dark color when starting out, as this will enable you to more clearly see the contrast.

 

The pattern yarn is typically double the thickness of the warp/tabby yarn. I used 10/2 pearl cotton in color Safari (pale tan) for the warp and tabby, and my primary pattern yarn was 5/2 pearl cotton in color Quarry (dark blue). I also experimented with some bright blue Harrisville Highland as well as a bulky white cotton yarn for the pattern picks. There is so much opportunity for experimentation here!

Summer & winter consists of 4-thread units, called blocks. You can repeat a unit as many times as you want in either warp or weft. On a 4-shaft loom, you can have 2 blocks. Block A is threaded 1-3-2-3 and Block B is threaded 1-4-2-4. I used shafts one and two for the plain weave threads and shafts three (Block A) and four (Block B) for the pattern threads.

A quick way to design your threading sequence for summer & winter is to use a profile draft. A profile draft is like the Cliff Notes version of your threading. I’ve sketched out a 16 thread pattern and it’s equivalent profile draft, so you can see how this approach can save you time and take up less space. You can note this on graph paper or as letters.

Block A = 1,3,2,1

Block A

Block B = 1,4,2,4

Block B

A threading pattern looks like this: 1-3-2-3-1-3-2-3-1-4-2-4-1-4-2-4, or in graph form:

Threding Draft

A profile draft expressed in letters looks like this: A-A-B-B, or in graph form:

Profile for Threading Draft

 

Weaving summer & winter

Every other pick is a tabby (plain weave) pick woven with the fine weft yarn, and every other pick is a pattern pick woven with the heavy weft yarn. You build up blocks by repeatedly weaving Block A or Block B. Since very other pick is tabby, your pattern threads are frequently secured, and long floats are not possible. This makes a very stable fabric.

Let’s look at the profile draft for this sampler. First, here is the profile draft expressed in letters:

A-B-A-A-A-B-A-B-B-B-B-B-B-B-B-A-A-A-A-A-B-B-B-A-B Repeat in reverse starting with B.

Here is the profile draft expressed on graph paper:

hanging draft

The profile draft above, tells you to thread your loom as follows: 1 unit of Block A (1-3-2-3), 1 unit of Block B (1-4-2-4), 3 units of Block A (1-3-2-3-1-3-2-3-1-3-2-3). 1 unit of Block B (1-4-2-4), 1 unit of Block A (1-3-2-3), and so on.

You will need six treadles for the tie-up, or four levers/treadles if you have a table loom or direct tie-up loom. I organize the treadles on my Baby Wolf with the tabby treadles tied up on the left and the pattern treadles tied up on the right so my left foot treadles Tabby A and Tabby B and my right foot treadles Pattern A1, Pattern A2, Pattern B1, and Pattern B2 (see photo). With every other pick being a tabby pick, this setup enables you to treadle left foot, right foot, left foot, right foot.

IMG_1528

The treadles are tied up as follows:

Tabby A: 1-2 (this means tie shafts 1 & 2 up to this treadle and so on)

Tabby B: 3-4

Pattern A1: 1-3

Pattern A2: 2-3

Pattern B1: 1-4

Pattern B2: 2-4

Now treadle tromp as writ (or the order in which the loom has been threaded). Here is how that treadling breaks down by block using the tie-ups I just listed:

Block A is treadled: Tabby A, Pattern A1, Tabby, B, Pattern A2

Block B is treadled: Tabby A, Pattern B1, Tabby B, Pattern B2

So, following the profile draft above, you would treadle as follows:

Tabby A, Pattern A1, Tabby B, Pattern A2

Tabby A, Pattern B1, Tabby B, Pattern B2

Tabby A, Pattern A1, Tabby B, Pattern A2

Tabby A, Pattern A1, Tabby B, Pattern A2

Tabby A, Pattern A1, Tabby B, Pattern A2

Tabby A, Pattern B1, Tabby B, Pattern B2

Tabby A, Pattern A1, Tabby B, Pattern A2

Etc. and repeat.

1+2

On to the sampler!

Loom: Baby Wolf

Warp and tabby weft: 10/2 pearl cotton in color Safari (light tan)

Pattern weft: 5/2 pearl cotton in Quarry (dark blue) (I also experimented with Harrisville Highland and a bulky cotton mystery yarn from my stash. The sky’s the limit!)

Sett: 20 ends per inch

Number of ends: 200 (50 blocks x 4 threads per block)

Warp length: 3 yd (or less). I warped 3 yards of fabric so that I could create the sampler and then have enough warp left over to weave a narrow runner for a small table in my house (though I ended using it for a hanging–see photo at the beginning of the article). If you are just weaving the sampler, you will need about a yard of warp for the sampler plus loom waste.

The sampler has seven different experiments that explore various treadling sequences and the use of different materials in the pattern weft:

  1. Tromp as writ – weave the entire threading sequence.
  2. Each block woven in a separate color, woven trompe as writ. I used the 5/2 Quarry blue for Pattern A and 5/2 wine tone purple for Pattern B. Again, same treadling sequence as in variation 1.
  3. Still using the blue and purple for blocks A and B, I changed my treadling to A-B-A-B-A-B, repeated. You can see that this creates an even distribution of light and dark areas, contrary to the spirit of summer & winter. I think it appears more as texture than distinct blocks.
  4. Using Harrisville Highland in Peacock Blue for the pattern weft, my treadling sequence was A-A-A-B-B-B repeated. This is a bolder design and I just love the texture!
  5. Now, let’s extend the blocks. Use your original colors. For block A, instead of weaving Tabby A, Pattern A1, Tabby B, Pattern A2, try using each pattern treadle twice in a row by weaving Tabby A, Pattern A1, Tabby B, Pattern A1, Tabby A, Pattern A2, Tabby B, Pattern A2. Make the same change for Block B and weave trompe as writ.
  6. Another change in Pattern: Weave A-A-A-A-A-B-B-B-B-B and repeat.
  7. Here I swapped out the 5/2 pattern weft for a bulky cotton yarn from my stash. I love that you can add texture and a bit of volume this way.

front

Feel free to experiment. What happens if you skip the tabby picks? Use the tabby weft for one of the pattern blocks and something completely different for the other? There are so many possibilities here!

If you would like to read more about summer & winter and check out some other pattern options, here is a list of books to get you started.

Happy Weaving!

Deborah Chandler, “Learning to Weave” pp. 184-190

Marguerite Porter Davison, “A Handweaver’s Pattern Book” pp. 187-194

Anne Dixon, “The Handweaver’s Pattern Directory” pp. 136 -145

Mary Black, “The Key to Weaving” pp. 311-336

Follow Melissa’s weaving adventures on Instagram.  @mlhankens • Instagram photos and videos

 

Melissa Ludden Hankens

You can find Melissa designing weaving projects for the Schacht newsletter and teaching at the Creative Warehouse in Needham, Massachusetts. Website - melentine.com Twitter - Melentine (@Melentine) Instagram - melentine on Instagram

Blue with Copper Accents Pillow – John Mullarkey

Pillow

Blue with Copper Accents Pillow

Designed by John Mullarkey

Skill level: Intermediate

Number of squares: 55

Size: 18” x 18”

Yarn: Miss Babs Yowza worsted weight wool in color, Blue Ridge, 1 8 oz skein. Trendsetter Ambrosia, in Rust, 1 Skein.

Notions: 18”x18” pillow form. Optional: 2” strip of Velcro.

Weaving: Weave 10 squares with Ambrosia or some other fun novelty yarn.  Weave 45 squares using Yowza.

 

Note about Ambrosia: It’s hard to believe that the fuzzy squares and the mattte/shiny squares are from the same skein, but they are. It’s like three yarns in one: a wool section, a fun fur section, and a metallic section. Have fun mixing and matching the sections to create accent squares.

Finishing and Assembly: Single crochet the squares together using Yowza following the pattern below. Gently wash by hand in cool water and lay flat to dry. The ridge from the single crochet will be on the wrong side of the fabric. Using Ambrosia, with wrong sides together, single crochet around the entire pillow. If desired, add a Velcro closure to the flap.

Layout

John Mullarkey

John Mullarkey has been tablet (card) weaving for over a decade. He teaches workshops at conferences and events around the country. He lives in St. Louis, Missouri. To learn more: www.malarkycrafts.com

Zoom Loom Valance – Stephanie Flynn Sokolov

 

Valance InstalledEquipment

Schacht Zoom Loom and Weaving Needle

Sewing needle

Darning needle

Materials

-1 Skein Juniper Moon Zooey: 03 White Pepper (60% linen/40% cotton, 284yd/100g)

-Matching sewing thread

-1 Skein Bella Lino: 8516 Flax (58% linen/26% viscose/16% cotton, 164yd/50g)

Instructions

To weave this window treatment, you will need to weave 24 squares of Zooey on the Zoom Loom. Feel free to scale your project to fit your favorite window. If you haven’t woven with a non-stretchy fiber on the Zoom Loom, keep the following in mind.

  • When setting up the loom for weaving a plain weave square, you will loosely wind the yarn around the pins as you warp the loom, leaving the threads slack.
  • Winding the yarn too tightly around the pins while warping will create such tight tension and eliminate the space your needle needs to go over and under the warp threads with ease. This creates stress on your hands, especially while trying to weave the last couple rows.

After you have woven the squares, finish each square by weaving in the ends along the edges. Starch, press and trim the ends. Lay the squares on a flat surface in the pattern pictured (square layout).

Square Layout

Using a sewing needle and matching sewing thread, stitch the squares together making sure that all the corners overlap their neighbor in the same direction for a consistent look.

Square Layout Close up

Now, fold over the edge squares as pictured, and stitch. When the edges are complete, fold over the top squares and only stitch the bottom of the V, leaving the space along the fold open for your curtain rod or wire. Using sewing thread, add a backstitch across the newly formed triangle to stabilize the top and create a pocket just under where the rod/wire will be inserted.

Embellishment

For embellishment, when the squares are all sewn together, use Bella Fino to stitch crosses at each intersection of the squares, except at the bottom points. Then make tassels out of the Bella Fino and attach them using the tassel ends to form crosses. Knot them in the back to secure.

Cross and Tassel Close up

Starch and press for a crisp, finished look. Voila!  Mount your valance onto a curtain rod or wire over your favorite window.

Tassel

To make a tassel, wind 16 wraps of the Bella Fino around a piece of cardboard 5” long. Thread a tapestry needle with the same yarn and slide it between the cardboard and the 16 wraps at one end of the card. Loop the thread over and go under the 16 wraps one more time and tie the bundle tightly in a square knot. Cut the thread leaving about 2” as a tail to attach to the valance. Slide the loop of threads off the cardboard, holding them tightly just below the tie. Begin winding the same threaded needle very tightly around the bundle 9 times, winding over the end of the thread to secure it in the bundle. To secure the end, while holding your wrapped threads, insert the needle into the wrapped threads through the center of the bundle. Press the needle on a hard surface and use a pliers to pull it towards the head of the tassel. Pull the thread through with a tug. Trim and bury in the head of the tassel.

Stephanie Flynn-Sokolov

Stephanie Flynn Sokolov trained in accessory design at the Fashion Institute of Technology. She teaches classes in weaving and spinning around the U.S. She lives in Boulder, Colorado.

Surprise Sugar Plum Fairy – Benjamin Krudwig

Sugarplum fairy Photo 6A

Skill Level: Beginner

Tools:
Zoom Loom
Weaving Needle
Tapestry Needle
Felting Needle
Crochet Hook
Optional Tools:
Incredible Rope Machine
Knitting Needles
Materials:
Sport Weight Wool Yarn in: Plum, Gray/Beige, and Green
Wool Roving or Leftover Yarn
Mohair Locks

Squares:
4- Plum
1- Grey/Beige
2- Green

Photo 1
Optional:
Beads
Embroidery Floss

Weaving:
Weave 7 squares in the colors specified above. Sew in tails and lightly full by hand in warm water. Lay flat to dry and steam press.

Assembly:
Dress Join 3 plum squares to create a ring. On one of the open ends, pull a thread in each square along the top edge and cinch to form the top of the skirt. For the bodice, fold the 4th plum square in half and seam the short ends together to create a small loop. Join the bottom of the small loop to the top of the skirt. (This is pretty cute on its own, and with a small hanger and some thread, this could make a great ornament.)

dress pieces Photo 2A
Head: Start by folding the gray/beige square in half, then roll it up, securing the edge of the roll to the body of the roll by a simple whipstitch. This should allow the center of the roll to pull out, creating a small pocket. Fill this pocket with wool or leftover yarn scraps, then sew the pocket up. The “stem” of the roll will serve as the neck of the fairy, and shaping it by stitching it together further will help the look of the finished piece.

Photo 3A Photo 3B Photo 3C

Wings and Leaf: (Make 2) Weave a length of matching yarn diagonally across the square, scrunch up the center, and then tie the length of yarn in a knot, securing the wing/leaf shape.

Photo 4A Photo 4B
Arms: Using a rope machine, make 2 passes of yarn in gray/beige, approximately 1/2 yard long. Tie knots approximately 7” apart from one another, and cut the rope on either side of these knots.
Alternate method: Knit some i-cord approximately 7” long and 3-4 stitches wide.
Adding the arms: Using a crochet hook, pass the arms through the sides of the bodice of the dress.
Attach the head: Place the neck of the head into the top bodice of the dress and tack it and the arms into place.

Photo 5
Add the wings: Stitch a wing/leaf to the back of the bodice.

Photo 6B
Stuff the bodice: Working on the inside, fill the bodice with wool or leftover yarn, and sew the bodice together, sewing 4 points together as shown. At this juncture, attach the remaining wing/leaf piece to create the leaves on the inside of the skirt.

Photo 2Bposter sugar plum
Drawstring: With one yard of gray/beige, create a thin rope by securing one end of the length of yarn to a table, adding twist to it, and then folding it in half, tying a knot in one side, and then letting it double back on itself. Weave the drawstring around the bottom edge of the dress, then tie a knot where the ends meet, and cut off the excess.
Adding hair: Needle felt mohair locks or yarn into place on top of the head.

Photo 7
Optional: Sew beads onto the face for eyes, decorate the bodice of the dress with embroidery or beads. Wrap an extra piece of the drawstring around the waist of the dress for added decoration.

Transform the Sugar Plum Fairy into a Sugar Plum by flipping the dress inside out and pulling the drawstring. Surprise!

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

Handmade With Handspun

Here at Schacht Spindle Company, we are no strangers to using handspun yarn in our projects. For many of us in the office, we rarely buy yarn, because our handspun stash grows so quickly. Events like the Tour de Fleece and Spinzilla give us an opportunity to really boost our stash of handspun, but sometimes that leads to project paralysis. After spinning so much yardage, many of us sit there wondering what to make with our handspun. We have a few projects for you whether you knit, crochet, or weave that are sure to utilize your handspun in the best of ways.

Spun yarn from Team Schacht Spindle in 2014

Weaving

You can make a handwoven blanket using a Zoom Loom and various yarns that you have spun as long as they are approximately fingering weight yarn.

David Pipinich made “Patched Life” with some handspun.

For something a little more decadent, some wall art can be made with your precious samples of handspun yarns.

Denise created three pieces, each using a bit of her handspun.

Or if you have a mind to weave a long wall hanging, you can follow along with Benjamin.

For something a bit more practical, and just as meaningful, you could weave a shawl to wear and remember what you’ve spun.

Smaller quantities of yarn make for great scarves like Denise’s Sashiko Posh Plum Scarf, or Benjamin’s Log Cabin Scarf.

For some yarns it doesn’t always make sense to make a garment or scarf, so something else must be done. Both the Pencil Case by Denise and the Back Pack by Benjamin would be great uses for that yarn you just don’t know what to do with.

Knitting

Handspun yarn tends to have a lot of energy, so it can make great knitting yarn.

A small cowl is good for small amounts of yardage, or you can spin your own gradient and make an entire shawl!

Crochet

If your yarn isn’t as consistent as you’d like and knitting with the yarn isn’t in your future, this fun kerchief is a great handspun project.

Knit and Crochet

And if you can’t quite decide whether you want to knit or crochet with your yarn, why not do both? This simple hat idea is great for those of us who are indecisive.

For more handspun projects, go to the link below. What do you make with your handspun yarn? Let us know in the comments!

Follow Schacht Spindle Company’s board Made With Handspun on Pinterest.

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

Upcycled Woven Pencil Box

Last year I made a woven notebook cover using fabric I had woven on my Cricket Loom. That project was fun, as it allowed me to breathe new life into an old sketchbook. I drew inspiration from the notebook cover and used the techniques from the Woven Sachet project by Jane Patrick to make a brand new-to-me pencil box.

I gathered a used chocolate box (no I didn’t eat them all myself), yarn in a complementary colorway, a weaving needle from my Zoom Loom, and some Mod Podge for fabric.

The yarn is Mountain Colors Crazyfoot in the Poppy Trail colorway.

Using similar directions from Jane’s project, I marked the edges of my box lid for where I would cut small slits for my yarn to wrap around. Using some sock yarn that was complementary to the box, I started warping the outer layer of my box lid. Since I was going to end up needle weaving the weft in place, I needed to wind off enough yarn to weave with. I measured this by wrapping the yarn around the box for as many times as I had notches on one side. I used a plain weave structure for the top of the box (I didn’t think a twill structure would be very visible).

 

Marking the edge before cutting was helpful in checking the spacing of my yarn.

After weaving the top of the box, it was time to weave around the outside edge of the box lid. I measured enough yarn to go around the sides five times and wove plain weave on the sides as well. The was quite open which let the back cover show behind the weaving, lending a dimensional quality to the fabric.

Warp threads waiting to be woven.

I used Mod Podge meant specifically for fabric to seal the yarn and secure it to the lid. I want this box to last a long time, so having it sealed and secure is necessary. The Mod Podge lessened the intensity of the colors of the yarn, but I love finished product!

While letting the lid dry, I moved on to the bottom of the box which I left unwoven. I drilled a 1/4″ hole about an inch out from each corner of the box.

I then made a rope using the Incredible Rope Machine. I made 3 passes with the yarn and made a rope that was approximately 1 yard long. I started with the bottom facing up, and threaded my rope in one hole from the outside and through the other one to the outside, making sure the rope was pretty close to centered end to end. I then poked each end through the remaining two holes and tied them together with a square knot.

Though I haven’t been in school for quite some time now, I still have a set of colored pencils that this special box would work great for. In the meantime however, my Zoom Loom and yarn fits very well inside.

-Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)–so he’s a great mix of data and creativity–all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You’ll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you’ve probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager–the main reason you’ve seen more activity on our Blog, Facebook, Ravelry, and Pinterest. To see what’s happening, click on the links below.

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

Woven Companion Cube by Sam Strasser

In keeping with the theme of art this week, we have a small inspiration post for you this weekend.

Though this could be considered a toy, it also functions as a small piece of “soft sculpture.” Sam Strasser, one of our CNC operators at the factory created a small cube inspired by the video game “Portal” by Valve Corporation.

To make this cube, weave 6 squares on the zoom loom with a grey wool yarn. Felt the squares and sew them into a cube shape. Before sewing the final square into the cube, take a small cube of wood and wrap it with batting to create a heavy, yet padded form for your woven cube to be sewn around. Use craft felt and embroidery thread to create the motifs and sew them onto each side of the cube. A little fabric glue may help to keep the felt cutouts in place.

Have you made any woven or spun art inspired by fictional references? Share them with us on social media!
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Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

Patched Life – David Pipinich

Though the Zoom Loom is considered a small loom, projects of large scale are easily attainable. An art piece such as this wall hanging allows us to explore color and the meaning behind the crafts we love. We hope you enjoy this piece from our former intern David Pipinich as much as we do.

“Textiles is an art of precision and details, and for me this becomes a therapeutic process. I try to express the humor I find in everyday life by using colors and changing the ways my audience looks at common
objects.”- David Pipinich

Patched Life – 2013 – 44″ x 32″

This piece was made from small woven squares woven on the Zoom Loom and then crocheted together. They represent small fragments of memories pieced together to make up who I am. Each square has multiple colors spun together to show how a memory is never a solid thing, but ever changing.

Detail of Patched Life

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David Pipinich

David Pipinich is a student in textiles and art education at CSU in Ft. Collins, CO. David also interned with Schacht and provided weaving assistance for Jane Patrick and Sara Goldenberg’s new book, “Simple Woven Garments”.

Fiber Art by Denise Renee Grace

The purpose of the Schacht blog has been and always will be to share and inspire ideas about weaving and spinning. Looking at all the weaving patterns, yarns, and colors, the possibilities really are endless. All of us could do projects for the rest of our lives and technically, we will never do the same thing twice.  We have shared projects and patterns in the crafts of weaving and spinning, but this week we want to share something less “functional”…art. FACE of Fiber in the Rockies is a juried art show that is scheduled this year to accompany the Estes Wool Market. A few weeks ago Denise applied for the show, and just received word that all of her pieces were accepted! Here are a few images of her work, and a brief statement about her art.

“I find it fascinating to see people’s different expressions in art or music or life in general. We have “voices” that evolve over the years from one style to another, but for the most part still seem to have a similar thread. Looking back on the art I made in college, I can tell that it was made by the same artist, but there are subtle differences in the techniques and execution of the art. I love working in a simple style and allowing the material speak for itself. I am just the instrument that molds it into what it wants to be. I hope this will inspire you to step outside the box a little and explore your voice.” – Denise Renee Grace

Peak Ascension

Peak Ascension, 29″ X 14″ – Fabric, handwoven fabric, photographic print on fabric.

Ancestors’ Garden

Ancestors’ Garden, 14″ X 29″ – Fabric, handwoven fabric, turitella agate.

Emerald Sea

Emerald Sea, 29″ X 14″ – Handwoven fabric, fabric, glass marbles.

 


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Jane Patrick

Jane Patrick is Creative Director of Schacht Spindle Company. She is an author, lecturer, and teacher. You can find her class: Creative Weaving Techniques on the Rigid Heddle Loom, on Craftsy.

Weaving a Twill Sampler – Part 2

I underestimated how exciting the process of weaving a sampler can be. Some of the tie-up and treadling combinations gave me unexpected results which gave me ideas to try out a few of the patterns on a larger scale.

  • Looking at the sampler below, starting at the left, is straight twill where your twill progresses in a single direction like a set of stairs. For this example, I threaded the shafts 1,2,3,4 (or the first thread on shaft 1, the second thread on shaft 2, the third thread on shaft 3 and the fourth thread on shaft 4, and so on).
  • Point twill happens when a twill weave starts in one direction, for at least three threads (according to Helene Bress), and then reverses itself. For example, here I threaded 1,2,3,4,3,2, repeat.
  • A broken twill is exactly what you might expect. Instead of progressing in a sequential numerical order, backward and/or forward, a break is made in the threading so that at least one harness is skipped in the order. For this example I threaded: 3,4,1,2,4 3 2 1, repeat.
  • Extended point twill is created by combining straight twill and point twill. Here I’ve threaded: 1,2,3,4, 1,2,3,4, 3,2,1,2,3,4,3,2,3,4, repeat
  • Bird’s Eye is a point twill or broken twill threading that traditionally creates a diamond pattern with a dot at its center. Here, I’ve threaded it: 4,3,2,3,4,1,2,3,4,3,2,1, repeat.

Each threading is approximately two inches across, give or take, using 3/2 mercerized cotton sett at 15 ends per inch. I would recommend using a dark color for your warp and a light color for your weft, or vice versa, so that you are able to clearly see the pattern you are weaving. You might also vary the warp thread color to distinguish the five threadings even further from each other – say black and charcoal or dark blue so that you still get a good contrast with your choice of weft threads. I selected two weft colors to use alternately as I went from one treadling sequence to the next. And finally, you can see that I also used a length of orange yarn to indicate where I changed my tie-up. Oh, and I came up with so many treadling sequences to try, that I ran out of white 3/2 cotton before I finished weaving. Oops!! A gold 3/2 cotton took over where the white left off.

Swatch 3
The fourth tie-up is a little bit different from the others. I got to thinking about my Wolf Pup, which is a direct tie-up loom. This means that each shaft (or harness) is attached to a single treadle. Table looms are similar in concept but use hand levers. To weave patterns that require multiple shafts to be raised at once, you press down multiple treadles or levers at one time. I got to thinking about how tying up a single shaft to a single treadle and using the direct tie-up technique of pressing down multiple treadles within the sequence might enable someone with a four-shaft loom with only four or six treadles or four levers to weave more complicated patterns. You will see the tie-up in this draft suggests that you need eight treadles. If you have them, great, but if you have fewer, simply tie-up 1-2-3-4, and when the draft indicates that you need to lift more than one shaft, use both of your feet, or hands in the case of a table loom, to accomplish this.

Draft 4
[Download a ZIP file of the drafts in WIF format, with their accompanying images,]
These samples showcase five common twill threadings across a single warp.

All of the samples (and drafts) are woven on the same threadings as listed above – straight, point, broken, extended point, and bird’s eye. The threading reads left to right and the treadling reads bottom to top. This will match the woven fabric in the photos.

Swatch 1




Swatch 2


Both sides of your cloth can be interesting and so different from each other. If you’re excited about something you find on the underside of your cloth, use the inverse of the tie-up to weave it on top. If you weave the first inch or so of cloth in plain weave as I did, you’ll see that a plain weave structure creates a thinner fabric with less draw-in, making a wider cloth.

You may find a new favorite pattern. Mine is found in draft three, the third treadling sequence of the point twill threading. It reminds me of a happy little flowerbed. The best thing about weaving a sampler is this sort of random discovery. Why not warp up your loom and give it a try?
Happy Weaving!

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Melissa Ludden Hankens

You can find Melissa designing weaving projects for the Schacht newsletter and teaching at the Creative Warehouse in Needham, Massachusetts. Website - melentine.com Twitter - Melentine (@Melentine) Instagram - melentine on Instagram

Handspun Wall Hanging – Benjamin Krudwig

Last August my wife and I went to New Mexico for our honeymoon, staying in both Taos and Santa Fe. While in Taos, we stayed in a quiet vacation home on an alpaca farm. After a few days of rest and relaxation, we traveled to Santa Fe for more arts and entertainment. So much of culture in the “Land of Enchantment” centered around fiber; fiber farms were down every country road, weaving studios were just around the corner, and rugs woven by locals could be seen hanging on walls and in window displays. The museums were filled with antique textiles, reminding me that all of this work was (and still is) done using simple tools. All of this texture in the animals, landscape, and culture made me buzz with creative excitement!

On one of our day trips to Ojo Caliente, we found ourselves surrounded by many simply stunning handwoven wall hangings; modern in color scheme with a minimalist vibe. Each piece had a gorgeous ombre weft, punctuated by thin horizontal lines of black. It took everything in my self control not to take one home. These particular works were extremely inspiring, filling my head with ideas for my own wall hanging.

Returning to Boulder, I couldn’t wait to get weaving again. As soon as I could, I pulled out my 15″ Cricket Loom and started playing around. I had recently Navajo plied some self-striping yarn that alternated between dark brown and bright yellow. (Look for a spinning tutorial in the future.) I decided to use this in the warp. For the weft, I used a blended handspun with the same two colored fibers carded together. This project allowed me to use some yarn that wasn’t suitable for wearing next to the skin, but still had great color and depth.

I warped the full width of the loom in a 10-dent reed. My warp length was about 5 feet.

Since the striping was spun into the yarn, it showed up in the warp automatically during the direct warping process. After hemstitching the end, I started weaving with dark brown handspun, wove for about a foot, and then switched to my blended yarn which I wove with for about a few more inches.

To create an open stripe in the middle of the weaving, I braided three bundles of  four warp threads for about an inch. This created braids on both ends of the length. I carried my shuttle up the edge of the braid and passed it through the center of the braid to lock in the motif (shown by the stick below). I repeated this technique across the width of the warp until I reached the other side. After the final braid, I pulled my weft yarn through to keep it all together, carried it up the side, and continued weaving.

The braiding technique shown on a sample warp.

I continued weaving with my blended yarn until I ran out, and then switched back to my dark brown. I ended the weaving with hemstitching and then braided the fringe on each end. I lightly felted the wall hanging. Because the two colors were different kinds of wool, they shrank at different rates. For the top edge, I folded the braids in half and tacked them down on the back so that I could pass a dowel through for hanging..

This is a pretty free-form piece. I had a basic plan, but not a solid picture of what it would turn out to be. I don’t mind the irregularities, and in fact they add an organic touch that I rather like. This wall hanging will always remind me of our trip to New Mexico, transporting me every time I look at it.

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Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

Ruched Centerpiece – Benjamin Krudwig

Every holiday in my childhood home was a spectacle. Seasonal decorations went up all over the house; no room was left untouched by the festive frock. To me, the table has always been the place where people come together, so it’s no wonder that I am drawn to making home-goods that belong on the dinner table.

As I was pondering this project, I knew that I wanted to make a centerpiece that would provide a textured backdrop for the rest of the Valentine’s Day decorations.

To start, weave 9 Zoom Loom squares. They could all be the same color (as shown) or they could be an assortment of colors. For this project, I used Neota Designs yarn, 50% Wool, 50% Silk, in the “Colorado Red” color-way. The silk added a decadent touch to this project, perfect for the season of romance.

Arrange the squares in a 3 x 3 grid, and seam them together. It is probably best to sew the squares together as opposed to crochet them together to eliminate as much extra bulk as possible.

Starting on one of the corners, pull the center vertical thread causing a gather or ruche. Cut that thread in half and tie the ends together in a double knot to prevent it from coming undone.


Alternate the direction (vertical or horizontal) of the thread that you pull on each square.

Pulling a horizontal thread in square 2.

Snip the tied ends close to the work to clean up the back of the piece. Gently wash the centerpiece, and lay flat to dry.

This project was fun and quick to make, and would be great in a larger scale. Ruching is an easy way to add a little bit of texture to piece of otherwise plain fabric. This project could easily be adapted to any time of the year, and if you choose a color scheme that matches your decor, it could be featured year-round. Make your own handwoven ruched fabric, send us photos on our Facebook and Twitter, and we may feature them!

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Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

A Dozen Red – Judy Pagels

Besides a box of chocolates, what is the quintessential Valentine’s Day gift? Having been a floral designer for 11 years (and counting) the definitive answer is red roses! This is my offering of the same, created with Zoom Loom Squares. Make your own, one or a dozen!

Most roses have names so mine will be called Colorado Red. This is the colorway of the yarn I used from Neota Designs, a 50% wool, 50% silk blend. This rich, complex red competes with the loveliest of the fresh varieties.

Each rose uses two squares. I fulled half of the squares to make them smaller for the inside of the rose.

Fulled rose on the right

Rose assembly: Fold the smaller, fulled square, in half and catch the edge about ¼” from the bottom with needle and yarn.

Start with the fulled square.Roll the square and catch the end to keep it together.

Fold the larger square in half and wind it around the first rolled square, adjusting the placement to achieve the best looking bloom.

With needle and yarn, about ¼” from the bottom, go sideways through all layers of the bloom. Then wrap the yarn around the base a couple of times to draw in the bottom a bit. Secure it and take a few stitches at the very base to make it smooth.

To attach a stem, I poked flocked floral wire threaded on a needle through the base of the rose.

Now, to create a hole for the stem, use a needle to create an opening at the base of the bloom. Insert the stem. I used a floral paper wrapped wire to give the stem some bulk and structure. Bend the flocked floral wire around the base of the rose and twist around the stem to secure.

A good floral designer always hides her mechanics so, to complete the rose, wrap the base of the bloom with some green fiber and needle felt it into place.


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Judy Pagels

Judy Pagels comes to Schacht from a varied background in printing, graphic design, and flower arranging. Hired initially as our shipping manager, Judy shortly afterwards was promoted to sales and service manager where she is in charge of new accounts, as well as sales and service. Judy is first a knitter, but also weaves and spins—always with a keen eye to great design.

Woven Heart Card – Jessica Knickman

Card design by Jessica Knickman

Craft your special Valentine a handmade card this year with this simply-woven card. The effect is lovely—and the technique is easy: just draw the design on the wrong side of the front of the card, cut slits in the card, weave across with paper, and back with a like color. Using good quality cards will contribute to the elegance of your greeting.

Materials: 4 ½” x 6” (11. 5 x 15 cm) white note card with beveled edge. Thin off-white paper, stiff white paper for backing, glue stick.

Equipment: Exacto knife, cutting mat, straight edge, ruler, pencil.

Resources: Paper, card and stationary stores.

Step 1. Draw the design on the wrong side of the card front. Measure and mark alternately 1/16” (2 mm) and 3/16” (6 mm) across the image to be woven.

Step 2. Cut out the 1/16” (2 mm) space completely.

Step 3. Cut ¼” (6 mm) paper strips.

Step 4. Weave them across, leaving about 1/16” (2 mm) space in between each row.

Step 5. Secure the weaving by gluing down the ends of the woven paper ends with a glue stick. Cut a piece of paper to match the card and glue it to the back to cover the raw edges of your weaving.

This project appears in Jane Patrick’s book Time to Weave, which is currently available as an e-book. This book is out-of-print, though we have limited copies here in our Schacht offices.
Make up your own design and share it with us on Facebook and Twitter using the hashtag #schachtspindle.
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Jane Patrick

Jane Patrick is Creative Director of Schacht Spindle Company. She is an author, lecturer, and teacher. You can find her class: Creative Weaving Techniques on the Rigid Heddle Loom, on Craftsy.

The Mini Loom Takes a Trip – Jane Patrick

If you’ve been trawling Pinterest, then you know that it’s back to the 70’s. At least, if you were weaving in the 70’s like I was. Little tapestry wall hangings with lots of texture and fringe that are reminiscent of what we were weaving are everywhere. Even Oprah magazine featured a weaver making these little textured hangings. The difference between then and now is that this time around the colors are brighter, lighter, more fun. Oh, and even macrame is back; fat, thick yarns worked over thick sticks. Really, I never thought we’d go there again. But that just goes to show you that what was old is always new again.

This little wall hanging, just 6” x 11”, is perfect for trying out ideas, learning techniques, and escaping from wintry ice and snow (whether it’s a fantasy trip or a real one). Cheerful colors call out for warmer climes and sunshine and working with them made me feel light of spirit.

I used the Schacht Mini Loom for this project. At about 8” square, it is small enough to pop into your carry-on (or your project bag if this is a stay-cation). The Mini Loom comes with a little hand beater, 2 shuttles and a weaving needle—which you’ll need as you get closer to the top edge. I also used a knitting needle as a shed stick which I wove over, under, over, under, leaving it in place–which makes weaving across in one shed super easy and the alternate shed easy to pick (you’ll see the knitting needle in the photo below).

For warp yarn, I took a trip to the hardware store and bought a ball of #24 cotton cable cord. I like this cord because it is a chunky size and sets well at 7 ½ epi on the Mini Loom. You could use most any sturdy, thick  string, though. I warped the loom the full width and after winding it on, tightened each warp thread by taking up the slack starting at one side of the loom and working to the other.

For yarns, I used some thrums and leftover bits from my stash. Since this doesn’t take a lot of yarn, you’ll find that little hangings are the perfect use of these yarns.

Yarns:
White background: white worsted weight yarn, such as Brown Sheep Lamb’s Pride.
Bottom fringe: Worsted weight yarn in three colors, two shades of each.
White loops: Two white sport weight yarns, one wool and one cotton.
Blue bumps: a bit of blue wool top
Pink tufts: The same two pink yarns used for the bottom fringe.

Weaving:
1 Weave 4 rows of background yarn, packing it in very tightly to cover the warp.
2. Make a row of ghiordes knots (directions below), leaving a 4” fringe. Using two yarns as one, make a green knot, then a blue knot, and then a pink knot. Repeat in this order all the way across the warp.
3. Weave 2 rows with background weft.
4. Make another row of ghiordes knots as you did in step 2.
5. Weave 4 rows of background.
6. Make a row of picked-up loops using two yarns as one (instructions below).
7. Repeat steps 5 and 6 five times, ending with another 4 rows of background.
8. Using wool top, make a row of loops, pulling them up to about ½” for a raised line.
9. Weave 6 rows of background.
10. Using two pink ends as one, make a row of ghiordes knots (instructions below). Start working over the 3rd and 4th warp threads, skip warps 5, 6, 7, 8 and make a knot over warp threads 9 and 10. Repeat in this fashion to the other side.
11. Weave 7 rows of background.
12. Make another row of ghiordes knots as before, but this time start the first knot over warps 6 and 7, skip 4 warp threads and then work the next knot. This will stagger the knots to make an alternating dot pattern.
13. Repeat steps 10-12 two more times and end with step 10.
14. Finish weaving with the background weft all the way to the top edge. As you get closer to the top, you’ll find that it is impossible to use the shuttle and you’ll need to change to the weaving needle.
15. When you can’t weave any further, remove the weaving from the loom. I found that there was a little space at either end of the weaving. I filled this by needle weaving two more rows of background to close up the space.
16. To finish, trim all pink ghiordes knot dots to ½”, trim bottom fringe so that it is even and about 4” long. Fold down the top of your hanging ½” to the back side and stitch down to make a hem.
17. Enjoy.

How to make a ghiordes knot using a continuous length of yarn
1. Insert the end of yarn between two warps (from top to bottom).
2. Bring the end out to the right of the two warps.
3. Travel over the top of the two warps to the left.
4. Bring the end up through the middle of the two warps.
5. Pull down the ends to tighten and trim off end.
6. Repeat.

How to make picked-up loops
1. Weave across with the loop yarn (if you are right handed it is easiest to weave from right to left).
2. Using a knitting knitting needle or your fingers and working from your dominant side, draw a loop up and place it over the needle (the size of the needle determines the size of the loop). Pull up loops between all of the warps or just some of them. This can be very flexible.
3. Carefully remove the knitting needle and press down on the loops with a beater.
4. Weave at least 2 rows of background and beat it in well to further secure the loops. Note: since the loops are not tied, they can be pulled out, so beating them well into place helps prevent them from pulling out.
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Jane Patrick

Jane Patrick is Creative Director of Schacht Spindle Company. She is an author, lecturer, and teacher. You can find her class: Creative Weaving Techniques on the Rigid Heddle Loom, on Craftsy.

Throwback Thursday – Weaving to Woo Week 2014

Last year we had our first holiday themed week on our blog. We posted a new Valentines Day themed project every day during the week of Valentine’s Day for our special Weaving to Woo Week!

This year we’re planning going five new projects during the first week in February–allowing plenty of time to create a special something for your special someone! Check back every day from February 2nd to the 6th for great gift and decor ideas.

In the meantime, check out last year’s Weaving to Woo Week projects.

The Lover’s Knot by Jane Patrick

Three Pocket Valentine Holder from Benjamin Krudwig

Heart Pin on our Zoom Loom with Jane Patrick

 Inlay Hearts on an inkle band by Jane Patrick

 Friendship Towel pattern, woven by Jane Patrick

finished towel

We’d love for you to share your own Valentine’s themed project with us on our various social media sites!

 

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

My Zoom Loom Gave To Me – Day 12

On the twelfth day of Christmas, my Zoom Loom gave to me.

Twelve Candy Twists

Eleven Christmas Elves

Ten Evergreen Dreams

Nine Precious Presents

Eight Holiday Hollies

Seven Sweet Things

Six Tiny Gift Bags

Five Dazzling Diamonds

Four Chillin’ Snowmen

Three Snow Birds

Two Santa Socks

One Star Tree Topper on the tree.

This concludes the Zoom Loom Ornament Weave Along!

Thank you for participating, and may these ornaments brighten up your 2014-2015 winter! See if your local dealer will be holding an event during December, or weave along at home! Post pictures on our Facebook, and chat with others on our thread on Ravelry!

  google+  pinterest  ravelry  twitter  youtube

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

My Zoom Loom Gave To Me – Day 11

On the eleventh day of Christmas, my Zoom Loom gave to me…

11 Christmas Elves

Introducing the Zoom Loom Ornament Weave Along!

Every day from November 24th to December 4th, we will be unveiling a new Zoom Loom ornament pattern on our blog!

See if your local dealer will be holding an event during December, or weave along at home! Post pictures on our Facebook, and chat with others on our thread on Ravelry!

  google+  pinterest  ravelry  twitter  youtube

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

Candy Twist

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

My Zoom Loom Gave To Me – Day 10

On the tenth day of Christmas, my Zoom Loom gave to me…

Ten Evergreen Dreams

Introducing the Zoom Loom Ornament Weave Along!

Every day from November 24th to December 4th, we will be unveiling a new Zoom Loom ornament pattern on our blog!

See if your local dealer will be holding an event during December, or weave along at home! Post pictures on our Facebook, and chat with others on our thread on Ravelry!

  google+  pinterest  ravelry  twitter  youtube

 

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

My Zoom Loom Gave To Me – Day 9

On the ninth day of Christmas, my Zoom Loom gave to me…

Nine Precious Presents

Introducing the Zoom Loom Ornament Weave Along!

Every day from November 24th to December 4th, we will be unveiling a new Zoom Loom ornament pattern on our blog!

See if your local dealer will be holding an event during December, or weave along at home! Post pictures on our Facebook, and chat with others on our thread on Ravelry!

  google+  pinterest  ravelry  twitter  youtube

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

My Zoom Loom Gave To Me – Day 8

On the eight day of Christmas, my Zoom Loom gave to me…

Eight Holiday Hollies

Introducing the Zoom Loom Ornament Weave Along!

Every day from November 24th to December 4th, we will be unveiling a new Zoom Loom ornament pattern on our blog!

See if your local dealer will be holding an event during December, or weave along at home! Post pictures on our Facebook, and chat with others on our thread on Ravelry!

  google+  pinterest  ravelry  twitter  youtube

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

My Zoom Loom Gave to Me – Day 7

On the seventh day of Christmas, my Zoom Loom gave to me…

Seven Sweet Things

Introducing the Zoom Loom Ornament Weave Along!

Every day from November 24th to December 4th, we will be unveiling a new Zoom Loom ornament pattern on our blog!

See if your local dealer will be holding an event during December, or weave along at home! Post pictures on our Facebook, and chat with others on our thread on Ravelry!

  google+  pinterest  ravelry  twitter  youtube

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

My Zoom Loom Gave To Me – Day 6

On the sixth day of Christmas, my Zoom Loom gave to me…

Six Tiny Gift Bags

Introducing the Zoom Loom Ornament Weave Along!

Every day from November 24th to December 4th, we will be unveiling a new Zoom Loom ornament pattern on our blog!

See if your local dealer will be holding an event during December, or weave along at home! Post pictures on our Facebook, and chat with others on our thread on Ravelry!

  google+  pinterest  ravelry  twitter  youtube

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

My Zoom Loom Gave To Me – Day 5

On the fifth day of Christmas, my Zoom Loom gave to me…

 Five Dazzling Diamonds

Introducing the Zoom Loom Ornament Weave Along!

Every day from November 24th to December 4th, we will be unveiling a new Zoom Loom ornament pattern on our blog!

See if your local dealer will be holding an event during December, or weave along at home! Post pictures on our Facebook, and chat with others on our thread on Ravelry!

  google+  pinterest  ravelry  twitter  youtube

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

My Zoom Loom Gave To Me – Day 4

On the fourth day of Christmas, my Zoom Loom gave to me…

Four Chillin’ Snowmen

Introducing the Zoom Loom Ornament Weave Along!

Every day from November 24th to December 4th, we will be unveiling a new Zoom Loom ornament pattern on our blog!

See if your local dealer will be holding an event during December, or weave along at home! Post pictures on our Facebook, and chat with others on our thread on Ravelry!

  google+  pinterest  ravelry  twitter  youtube

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

My Zoom Loom Gave To Me – Day 3

On the third day of Christmas, my Zoom Loom gave to me…

Three Snow Birds!


Introducing the Zoom Loom Ornament Weave Along!

Every day from November 24th to December 4th, we will be unveiling a new Zoom Loom ornament pattern on our blog!

See if your local dealer will be holding an event during December, or weave along at home! Post pictures on our Facebook, and chat with others on our thread on Ravelry!

  google+  pinterest  ravelry  twitter  youtube

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.