DIY Zoom Loom Holiday Flower Lights

A few years ago we collaborated with Interweave to create a project for the “DIY Holiday” special issue. We are thrilled share this project with you now as we head into 2017.

The Schacht Team pulled together to create another community project, with each of us choosing a color of embroidery floss and weaving a number of squares in that color. The resulting project can be easily customized for the holidays or any color scheme you prefer. The options are endless!

beauty-shot

Holiday Flower Lights

Designed by Benjamin Krudwig – Woven by the Schacht Team

Equipment: Schacht Zoom Loom and 6″ weaving needle.

Yarns: Two 27 yard skeins each of size 5 DMC embroidery floss in the following colors: Snow White, Medium Blue Violet, Rose, Coral, Peacock, Medium Forest Green.

supplies

Accessories: LED light string (be careful not to use any other variety as the heat could create a fire hazard).

Weaving: Weave enough squares to cover each of your LED light bulbs. The string we used had 30 lights, so we wove five squares in each of the 6 colors. Depending on your color scheme and number of lights, you may need more yardage of embroidery floss.

Assembly: Make each square into a flower using the detailed instructions below, and start attaching them to the string lights. Push the LED bulb through the center of the flower, tie the excess threads (from pulling) around the string light. Secure with a little super glue or a dab of hot glue. You can click on each picture to make it larger.

Repeat this process until all of the lights are covered.

Plug in and enjoy!

If you make this project, share it with us on Instagram and tag your post with #SchachtSpindle and #ZoomLoom.

 

Learn something new in the New Year!Creative Weaving Techniques on the Rigid Heddle Loom with Jane Patrick

If you’ve mastered the Zoom Loom and want to expand your weaving horizons, try rigid heddle weaving!

Creative Weaving Techniques on the Rigid Heddle Loom is full of finger controlled and pick-up techniques to help you create stunning projects with lots of texture and visual interest!

Here’s the class overview from Craftsy!

“Turn your fabric dreams into woven realities with longtime weaving instructor Jane Patrick! During class, Jane will teach you versatile methods that open up new design possibilities for weaving on a rigid heddle loom. You’ll start with skills for stripes, open-weave fabrics and brilliant textures. Then, go beyond the grid to create curves and more, as Jane guides you through working with deflection, pulled threads and differential shrinkage. Want to take the fuss out of working with finer yarns? You’ll discover techniques for working with two heddles at a finer sett. Plus, you’ll end class with fun double-weaving techniques you can use for more complex, layered fabrics that look different on either side.”

Select courses on Craftsy from Jane Patrick are 33% off until March 14, 2017 when you use this link. This cannot be combined with any other coupons.

Schacht Spindle

Schacht Spindle Company has been producing hand-crafted weaving and spinning equipment in Boulder, CO since 1969. We are committed to producing the tools for the crafts we love.

Handspun dyed roving explorations on the Zoom Loom

Just about every time I finish sampling dyed roving or top and knit a swatch, I wonder what it would look like woven.

This week I finally gave in to my curiosity. I spun some divine Shetland from Into the Whirled, colorway: Element Number Five into a singles yarn and a 2-ply yarn. Then I knit a swatch and wove swatches on my Zoom Loom. It made my head explode a little with ideas and more questions. I think this bit of swatching has started a new fascination with weaving variegated fiber.

I started with the singles yarn first. The yarn, as a variegated singles, has long color runs, not broken by marling with another ply. I knew what would happen with knitting, but I had no idea what weaving would look like.

2-singles-yarn

I knit a swatch in stockinette and it made wonderful clear stripes, just as I expected. But when I wove the yarn on the Zoom Loom it was something else entirely. First, I was frustrated because the colors didn’t change much in a single square. Truthfully, I almost abandoned the experiment. But instead, I wove two more swatches. I just tossed the Zoom Loom in my bag and carried it around on waiting errands for a couple of days, and poof, the squares were done. The colors didn’t change much in a single square, but they change and flow between squares. When I put the squares in order, I said “uh oh” out loud because I knew that I was standing on the edge of a new rabbit hole.

3-knit-woven-singles

I can see in the woven swatches, looking top to bottom, how the yarn went from light blue (with a single hit of blue-purple), to light blue, purple, dark pink and even some dark orange in the middle, to light blue and purple in the third. I didn’t pay attention while I was winding on the loom or weaving how I was laying down the colors. Next time I would photograph every layer through the winding on and weaving process, so I could better follow what the color is doing. I really want to weave through a whole 4 ounces of singles and make something with my squares that show the progression. Then of course I would add a little bit of knitted fabric too, as a textural and chromatic counterpoint.

I managed to pull myself away from the weaving with singles rabbit hole to knit and weave with 2-ply yarn. I spun the fiber randomly with no planning, so it matches in some spots and marls in others.

With the 2-ply I was surprised to see that the knitting and weaving look similar-ish in their swatches. The weaving is more speckled due to how the cloth is made, but it is a great complement to the knitted cloth, I really like how they look together. My head is dreaming up a pattern or two for this combination.

4-2-ply-woven-and-knit

I find it interesting that the swatches woven on the Zoom Loom don’t stripe because of the combination of layers and longer color runs, even in the two ply, when the colors are much shorter. If I want to play with the striping of handspun, variegated yarn, I’ll have to turn to my Cricket loom. Uh oh.

Still curious about spinning and knitting dyed roving and top?  My new book Yarnitecture: The Knitter’s Guide to Spinning: Building Exactly the Yarn You Want has a lot of tip and ideas to explore.

Ask for Jillian’s new book, Yarnitecture: The Knitter’s Guide to Spinning: Building Exactly the Yarn You Want, published by Storey Publishing (2016), at your favorite fiber supplier. It’s a terrific resource that will bring a new dimension to your yarn spinning

Jillian Moreno is the editor of Knittyspin and is on the editorial board of PLY Magazine. She frequently contributes to Spin-Off and PLY magazines and teaches all over North America. Be warned, she is a morning person and frequently breaks into song before 9 am. You can keep up with her fibery exploits at www.jillianmoreno.com.

yarnitecture

Win a copy of Yarnitecture!

Head over to Instagram between December 15th and 30th, and post a picture of your Schacht wheel or drop spindle and tell us why you want the Yarnitecture Book. Tag your post with #schachtgiveaway to be entered to win a copy. Winner will be announce on Instagram on January 2nd.

Jillian Moreno

3 Handmade Gift Wrapping Ideas

The holidays are right around the corner, and when you’ve spent so much time and effort making your handmade gifts, it would be a shame not to have the same handmade touch for the packaging.

In this post, we share three ways to add hand-crafted wrapping to your special gift.

Sugar Pines Band, woven by Jane Patrick

cards-on-loom

Adapted from Belt No 12, Sugar Pines in Card Weaving or Tablet Weaving by Russell E. Groff. Look for a collection of designs by weaver Russell E. Groff in an upcoming book from Schiffer Publishing.

Equipment: 25 Schacht Cardweaving Cards, Schacht Belt Shuttle, Schacht Inkle Loom.

Yarns: 5/2 Pearl Cotton. 125 yd #152 Pistachio, 175 yd #91 Flaxon, 15 yd #12 Red, and 30 yd #99 Dark Sienna.

Warping: We wove this project on an inkle loom, winding 4 threads, one card at a time, following the pattern diagram. (We warped all of the pegs on our Schacht Inkle Loom.)

Threading: All of the cards are right-threaded. That is, all of the four threads can be seen on the right side. For this project, the printed side of the card is facing to the right.

threading-pattern

Sugar Pines Threading Graph PDF

Weaving: Wind a Schacht Belt Shuttle with 5/2 Pearl Cotton in #152 Pistachio. Make sure that the A-D (red) side is on top and then weave 4 quarter turns towards you, 4 quarter turns away from you. Repeat for the length of the belt.

sugar-pines

Zoom Loom Bow

This project is a quick and easy way to create a small bow for a package.

wrapped-log-scarf

Equipment: Schacht Zoom Loom

Yarn: Any sport weight yarn.

Weaving: First, weave a square on your Zoom Loom. Before taking the square off the loom, weave your ends into the square, leaving the long tail coming from approximately the top center of the square.

Remove the square from the loom, and with your 6″ weaving needle, weave the long tail through the center of the square as shown.

Gently pull this piece of yarn while gathering the square into a bow shape. Gently wrap the leftover yarn around the center of the bow and tie it into a knot. Then with another piece of yarn, attach the bow to your package.

Handspun “Twine”

dropspindle-ornament

Show off your spinning prowess by using your drop spindle to spin some home-made twine to tie up your packages!

wrapped-present

We hope you enjoy these ideas for your special gifts this holiday season!

 

Schacht Spindle

Schacht Spindle Company has been producing hand-crafted weaving and spinning equipment in Boulder, CO since 1969. We are committed to producing the tools for the crafts we love.

Zoom Loom Turkey

Zoom Loom Turkey

Benjamin Krudwig

ZL turkey - finished

Here’s a quick project you can weave up just in time for Thanksgiving. The project requires only 4 squares, so you could easily finish in time to include Mr. Tom for your Thanksgiving table décor. Or, if you’re feeling ambitious: weave one for every place setting—a take-home gift for all of your guests.

Skill: Beginner

Equipment: Schacht Zoom Loom

zoom loom with hands

Yarn: 36-40 yards of King Cole Drifter DK in the Color (Shade 1367) are needed for 4 squares.

Weaving: Weave 4 squares. Since this is a variegated, spaced-dyed yarn, each square will look a little different.

zl-turkey-squares

Assembly: Sew 3 squares into a 1×3 strip. Accordion fold this piece and stitch one end together to create a fan shape. Set aside

zl-turkey-sewing-step-1

Orient the 4th square so it is a diamond. Fold the top two sides to the center to create an upside down kite-shape. Sew these edges together.

Fold the edges to the center one more time to create a skinnier kite shape. Then fold the edges together. Stitch along the edge. Fold down the skinny top to form a head and stitch it down.

zl-turkey-sewing-step-2

Sew this piece onto the front of the fan shape.

Benjamin Krudwig has a double degree in biology and photography. He also spins, weaves, knits and crochets.

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

Three Easy Woven Brooklyn Tweed Projects Perfect for This Fall

 

Earlier this year, We e-mailed the team at Brooklyn Tweed to see if they wanted to participate in one of our collaborations for 2016. I was thrilled when I heard that Jared Flood, Founder and Creative Director of Brooklyn Tweed, wanted to see what we could do. Not only were they game for a collaboration, they mentioned that they were releasing a new yarn in the fall that would be ideal for weaving.

Be still my beating heart.

I have been following Brooklyn Tweed since before they carried yarn, when they were primarily a knitting pattern powerhouse, so this opportunity was one I could not pass up. After talking to the team here at Schacht, and the team at Brooklyn Tweed, we decided to do a 3-piece woven collection focusing on their new yarn, Arbor. This series includes a zoom loom hat, a modern poncho, and a lovely fringed pillow. These projects are primarily made out of Arbor, but two of them also utilize Quarry, Brooklyn Tweed’s chunky weight yarn.

Before planning anything, we played around on the Zoom Loom weaving swatches with all of Brooklyn Tweed’s main yarn lines, Loft, Shelter, Quarry, and now Arbor. All of these yarns (except for Quarry) wove up easily on the Zoom Loom, and never was I concerned about the lofty-spun yarns separating. I did find a work-around for Quarry on the Zoom Loom which will be featured in a how-to on weaving bulky yarns on the Zoom Loom in the future.

 

Zoom Loom Plaid Redux Hat – Benjamin Krudwig

bt-hat

 

Difficulty Level: Easy

Equipment: Schacht Zoom Loom, weaving needle.

Yarn: Arbor from Brooklyn Tweed – DK weight in Alizarin – 1 skein 145 yards per skein

Quarry from Brooklyn Tweed – Bulky Weight in Moonstone – 20 yards (200 yards per skein)

Weaving: Weave 17 squares with Alizarin. While each square is still on the loom, weave 4 supplementary rows in a contrasting yarn, Quarry (bulky weight) in color Moonstone. Weave these accents randomly so there is little repetition from square to square, windowpane fashion. I call this pattern “Plaid Redux”. Use caution when pulling the bulky Quarry yarn through the woven fabric.

Assembly: Create two strips of 8 squares. Sew the ends of each strip together to create two loops of 8 squares. Offset these two loops by half a square and sew the loops together (see diagram below).

Take the final square and sew each side to every other square along the top of the upper loop (see diagram below). There will be 4 squares on the upper loop that won’t be attached to the crown square, take some excess yarn and weave through the top edge, then cinch it tight to close the holes. Stitch the holes shut if necessary.

assembly-of-the-hat

Finishing: heavily full the hat until felted; stop when you reach a good fit for your head.

Optional: AFTER felting the hat, create a large pompom out of Quarry and sew it to the top using a length of Arbor.

 

Pale Blue Fringed Pillow – Jane Patrick

 

pale-blue-pillow

Difficulty Level: Easy

Equipment: Schacht 15” Cricket Loom Kit, 1 15” stick shuttle.

Warp Yarn: Arbor from Brooklyn Tweed DK weight in Treehouse, 2 skeins, 145 yards per skein.

Weft Yarn: Arbor from Brooklyn Tweed DK weight, 1 skein each of Dorado and Rainier, 145 yards, per skein.

Warp length: 56” which includes take-up and 18” loom waste.

Width in reed: 15”

E.P.I.: 8

Total warp ends: 118

Total yardage needed: 185 yards

PPI: 8 (1 skein is perfect for this project, if you beat more than 8 ppi or weave longer, you’ll need another skein of Dorado.

Weaving: Use Dorado for the plain weave. Use Rainier doubled for the ghiordes knots. Weave 1” of plain weave. Tie the first row of ghiordes knots. It is important to begin at the correct place, as this first row of knots sets up the remainder of the rows. Using the key, make a row of knots following pattern A, weave 4 rows of plain weave, and then make a row of knots following pattern B. Weave 4 rows of plain weave and repeat.

 

Key to ghiordes knots rows.

ghiordes-knot-key

Note: Alternate rows A and B checking to be sure that the rows of knots alternate and line up. Working right to left, work in this way: count over 9 warps and then tie two ghiordes knots (each ghiordes knot is tied over 2 warps, so 2 knots require 4 warp ends [XXXX] on the diagram), skip 12 warp threads and tie another set of knots, and so on.

Measure weaving off tension until the pattern is square. Weave the backing in plain weave for 20”.

Finishing: Remove the fabric from the loom and secure the ends. Wash by hand in hot water with mild agitation. If the fabric is not fulled sufficiently, place in hot dryer for a few minutes, watching carefully. Lay flat to dry and then steam press.

Assembly: Zigzag and straight stitch between all cutting lines. Cut three pieces: the front leaving a ½” seam allowance at either end, cut the two pieces for the back which includes a flap closing–1 piece 8” long and another piece 9” long.

Sew a 1” hem in the longest piece and then attach the hook side of a 2” piece of a hook side of Velcro (the Velcro will stick to the wool fabric) and sew this to the hem on the wrong side. Turn under 1/2″ along the long edge of the other back piece and stitch.

Place the pillow front (fringe) side up (I used lengths of masking tape and temporarily taped the fringe to the inside to make sure it would not interfere with stitching). Place the back pillow piece with the Velcro facing up on top of the pillow front, and finally, overlap the short back flap piece on top of the Velcro piece. Sew around all sides. Press and turn right sides out.

Fill with your own pillow form or make your own with fiberfill and scrap fabric and insert in to your pillow. Enjoy!

 

Windowpane Poncho – Denise Renee Grace

rolled-collar

Difficulty Level: Easy

Equipment: 20” Flip loom with an 8-dent reed, tapestry needle for sewing.

Warp yarn: Arbor from Brooklyn Tweed DK weight in “Cobbler” 2.8 skeins, 145 yards per skein – 408 yards total.

Weft Yarn: Arbor from Brooklyn Tweed DK weight in “Cobbler” 1.2 skeins, 145 yards per skein – 174 yards total.

Quarry from Brooklyn Tweed Bulky weight in “Sulphur” 1 skein, 200 yards per skein

Warp length: 92” which includes take-up and loom waste.

Width in reed: 20”

EPI: 8

Total warp ends: 160

PPI: 6-8, this may need adjusting since you are using two weights of yarn.

Weaving: Hemstitch at the beginning.

fabric-detail

Weave plain weave through out. Weave Arbor for 1″ then, alternate between Arbor and Quarry every other pick. Be sure to weave a balanced plain weave so the picks of Quarry look square. Weave to the end of your warp, ending with 1″ of Arbor like in the beginning. Hemstitch at the end.

Assembly: Lay length of fabric down in a straight line. Bring one end down to a point. Bring the other end to a point overlapping the other end. With a 10 yard length of arbor, sew a square with a whip stitch where these points overlap.

Finishing: Hand wash, dry flat. Once dry, put in the dryer on medium heat for about 10 minutes until sufficiently fulled, checking often.

We hope you enjoy these fun and versatile projects. We hope you will be inspired to try these great projects and would love to see them. Be sure to tag your social media posts #schachtspindle, and #weavingwithbt so we can see them and share them!

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

Denise Renee Grace

Denise Renee Grace first learned to weave as a student at Bethel College. She later moved to Boulder and worked in a re-purposed product company where Barry Schacht discovered her and hired her to work in our sales and service department. Denise’s first love is spinning and she is especially fond of working with natural fibers on all four of her Schacht Wheels. When it comes to weaving, tabby tickles her. In charge of customer care, Denise spends her days here helping people—something she does so well.

Jane Patrick

Jane Patrick is Creative Director of Schacht Spindle Company. She is an author, lecturer, and teacher. You can find her class: Creative Weaving Techniques on the Rigid Heddle Loom, on Craftsy.

Road Trip Weaving

Road trips are in! So, take to the highway with these favorite books for summer learning, weaving and felting.

The Schacht Zoom Loom can slip into backpack or carry-on for weaving on the go. Two terrific books: 100 Pin Loom Squares by Florencia Campos Correa. More than just squares, this inspirational title with the Zoom Loom on the cover (!) includes color and weave patterns, novelty yarns, and projects that are hip and inspirational. Pin Loom Weaving by Margaret Stump. If you want a lot of cute patterns for making animals, quilts, or even a Barn House Tote, Pin Loom Weaving will take you there. Warping and weaving instructions are included along with clear step-by-step project details.

100-pin-loom

Pack your inkle loom in the back seat of your Rambler, along with the Weaver’s Inkle Pattern Directory by Anne Dixon. You’ll never be without patterns with over 400 of them included between the covers. Also, pack some of our Schacht Card Weaving Cards (we love everything about them) and weave away with these on your inkle loom using the classic book, Card Weaving by Candice Crockett for instruction and inspiration.

We have a few copies left of Time to Weave by Jane Patrick which will give you lots of ideas to use objects you find along the way to create a woven memento of your time on the road. Lots of great ideas for kids, too.

Combine felting with weaving, or just create cute felted critters. All you need to do is to pack some colorful fiber, your felting needles and pad, and take along the fun Making Felted Friends by Sue Pearl. You’ll find that once you get started, it’s hard to stop.

felted-friends

Happy trails and we’d love to see your projects made along the road, no matter where your travels take you. Happy summer! Your Schacht team.

Jane Patrick

Jane Patrick is Creative Director of Schacht Spindle Company. She is an author, lecturer, and teacher. You can find her class: Creative Weaving Techniques on the Rigid Heddle Loom, on Craftsy.

Blue with Copper Accents Pillow – John Mullarkey

Pillow

Blue with Copper Accents Pillow

Designed by John Mullarkey

Skill level: Intermediate

Number of squares: 55

Size: 18” x 18”

Yarn: Miss Babs Yowza worsted weight wool in color, Blue Ridge, 1 8 oz skein. Trendsetter Ambrosia, in Rust, 1 Skein.

Notions: 18”x18” pillow form. Optional: 2” strip of Velcro.

Weaving: Weave 10 squares with Ambrosia or some other fun novelty yarn.  Weave 45 squares using Yowza.

 

Note about Ambrosia: It’s hard to believe that the fuzzy squares and the mattte/shiny squares are from the same skein, but they are. It’s like three yarns in one: a wool section, a fun fur section, and a metallic section. Have fun mixing and matching the sections to create accent squares.

Finishing and Assembly: Single crochet the squares together using Yowza following the pattern below. Gently wash by hand in cool water and lay flat to dry. The ridge from the single crochet will be on the wrong side of the fabric. Using Ambrosia, with wrong sides together, single crochet around the entire pillow. If desired, add a Velcro closure to the flap.

Layout

John Mullarkey

John Mullarkey has been tablet (card) weaving for over a decade. He teaches workshops at conferences and events around the country. He lives in St. Louis, Missouri. To learn more: www.malarkycrafts.com

Zoom Loom Valance – Stephanie Flynn Sokolov

 

Valance InstalledEquipment

Schacht Zoom Loom and Weaving Needle

Sewing needle

Darning needle

Materials

-1 Skein Juniper Moon Zooey: 03 White Pepper (60% linen/40% cotton, 284yd/100g)

-Matching sewing thread

-1 Skein Bella Lino: 8516 Flax (58% linen/26% viscose/16% cotton, 164yd/50g)

Instructions

To weave this window treatment, you will need to weave 24 squares of Zooey on the Zoom Loom. Feel free to scale your project to fit your favorite window. If you haven’t woven with a non-stretchy fiber on the Zoom Loom, keep the following in mind.

  • When setting up the loom for weaving a plain weave square, you will loosely wind the yarn around the pins as you warp the loom, leaving the threads slack.
  • Winding the yarn too tightly around the pins while warping will create such tight tension and eliminate the space your needle needs to go over and under the warp threads with ease. This creates stress on your hands, especially while trying to weave the last couple rows.

After you have woven the squares, finish each square by weaving in the ends along the edges. Starch, press and trim the ends. Lay the squares on a flat surface in the pattern pictured (square layout).

Square Layout

Using a sewing needle and matching sewing thread, stitch the squares together making sure that all the corners overlap their neighbor in the same direction for a consistent look.

Square Layout Close up

Now, fold over the edge squares as pictured, and stitch. When the edges are complete, fold over the top squares and only stitch the bottom of the V, leaving the space along the fold open for your curtain rod or wire. Using sewing thread, add a backstitch across the newly formed triangle to stabilize the top and create a pocket just under where the rod/wire will be inserted.

Embellishment

For embellishment, when the squares are all sewn together, use Bella Fino to stitch crosses at each intersection of the squares, except at the bottom points. Then make tassels out of the Bella Fino and attach them using the tassel ends to form crosses. Knot them in the back to secure.

Cross and Tassel Close up

Starch and press for a crisp, finished look. Voila!  Mount your valance onto a curtain rod or wire over your favorite window.

Tassel

To make a tassel, wind 16 wraps of the Bella Fino around a piece of cardboard 5” long. Thread a tapestry needle with the same yarn and slide it between the cardboard and the 16 wraps at one end of the card. Loop the thread over and go under the 16 wraps one more time and tie the bundle tightly in a square knot. Cut the thread leaving about 2” as a tail to attach to the valance. Slide the loop of threads off the cardboard, holding them tightly just below the tie. Begin winding the same threaded needle very tightly around the bundle 9 times, winding over the end of the thread to secure it in the bundle. To secure the end, while holding your wrapped threads, insert the needle into the wrapped threads through the center of the bundle. Press the needle on a hard surface and use a pliers to pull it towards the head of the tassel. Pull the thread through with a tug. Trim and bury in the head of the tassel.

Stephanie Flynn-Sokolov

Stephanie Flynn Sokolov trained in accessory design at the Fashion Institute of Technology. She teaches classes in weaving and spinning around the U.S. She lives in Boulder, Colorado.

Surprise Sugar Plum Fairy – Benjamin Krudwig

Sugarplum fairy Photo 6A

Skill Level: Beginner

Tools:
Zoom Loom
Weaving Needle
Tapestry Needle
Felting Needle
Crochet Hook
Optional Tools:
Incredible Rope Machine
Knitting Needles
Materials:
Sport Weight Wool Yarn in: Plum, Gray/Beige, and Green
Wool Roving or Leftover Yarn
Mohair Locks

Squares:
4- Plum
1- Grey/Beige
2- Green

Photo 1
Optional:
Beads
Embroidery Floss

Weaving:
Weave 7 squares in the colors specified above. Sew in tails and lightly full by hand in warm water. Lay flat to dry and steam press.

Assembly:
Dress Join 3 plum squares to create a ring. On one of the open ends, pull a thread in each square along the top edge and cinch to form the top of the skirt. For the bodice, fold the 4th plum square in half and seam the short ends together to create a small loop. Join the bottom of the small loop to the top of the skirt. (This is pretty cute on its own, and with a small hanger and some thread, this could make a great ornament.)

dress pieces Photo 2A
Head: Start by folding the gray/beige square in half, then roll it up, securing the edge of the roll to the body of the roll by a simple whipstitch. This should allow the center of the roll to pull out, creating a small pocket. Fill this pocket with wool or leftover yarn scraps, then sew the pocket up. The “stem” of the roll will serve as the neck of the fairy, and shaping it by stitching it together further will help the look of the finished piece.

Photo 3A Photo 3B Photo 3C

Wings and Leaf: (Make 2) Weave a length of matching yarn diagonally across the square, scrunch up the center, and then tie the length of yarn in a knot, securing the wing/leaf shape.

Photo 4A Photo 4B
Arms: Using a rope machine, make 2 passes of yarn in gray/beige, approximately 1/2 yard long. Tie knots approximately 7” apart from one another, and cut the rope on either side of these knots.
Alternate method: Knit some i-cord approximately 7” long and 3-4 stitches wide.
Adding the arms: Using a crochet hook, pass the arms through the sides of the bodice of the dress.
Attach the head: Place the neck of the head into the top bodice of the dress and tack it and the arms into place.

Photo 5
Add the wings: Stitch a wing/leaf to the back of the bodice.

Photo 6B
Stuff the bodice: Working on the inside, fill the bodice with wool or leftover yarn, and sew the bodice together, sewing 4 points together as shown. At this juncture, attach the remaining wing/leaf piece to create the leaves on the inside of the skirt.

Photo 2Bposter sugar plum
Drawstring: With one yard of gray/beige, create a thin rope by securing one end of the length of yarn to a table, adding twist to it, and then folding it in half, tying a knot in one side, and then letting it double back on itself. Weave the drawstring around the bottom edge of the dress, then tie a knot where the ends meet, and cut off the excess.
Adding hair: Needle felt mohair locks or yarn into place on top of the head.

Photo 7
Optional: Sew beads onto the face for eyes, decorate the bodice of the dress with embroidery or beads. Wrap an extra piece of the drawstring around the waist of the dress for added decoration.

Transform the Sugar Plum Fairy into a Sugar Plum by flipping the dress inside out and pulling the drawstring. Surprise!

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

Cindy Lair’s Candy Cover

Picture of embroidered cap and zoom loom square.


“I want you to write a travel blog piece for Schacht.” Ben said.

“What do you mean?” starting to back away from Ben’s desk.

Ben continued, “You know, weave or spin something that is inspired by travel.”

Clearly, blogging at Schacht included more than writing. My brain illuminated like a neon sign flashing on and off in the dark. “WORK, WORK, WORK”

Laughing hysterically I walked away, a little flattered and completely intimidated by the amount of work to accomplish such a project. Hmm… weave or spin something inspired by travel. My mind began to spin thoughts of Central Asia. The “STANS” were on my radar because I had been asked to go to Tajikistan and Uzbekistan recently. I fell into my obsession with Central Asia honestly. I was, as often is the case, looking for something to read that would transport me through travel to some other life. Perusing the shelves of a local bookstore I found just the ticket, Shadow of the Silk Road by Colin Thubron (Chatto and Windus) 2006. I spent time traveling through China to all the “STAN’S” (Kirghizstan, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan, Afghanistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan) all the while remaining firmly at home in Boulder, Colorado.

An elaborately cross stitched skull cap possibly of Uzbek origin caused me to become enamored with looking at textiles from the region, which of course landed me with another book, Traditional Textiles of Central Asia by Janet Harvey (Thames and Hudson) 1997 bringing a world of beautiful textiles to my fingertips. My mind flashed upon the beautiful abr silk cloth used for clothing in rural Central Asia. I could do a weaving! Yeah…NO! Then I thought of the sumptuous embroidery, I can actually, mmm…sort of embroider. Well, okay I only know one stitch. I don’t really spin or weave, so I was a bit perplexed. Eventually, I came up with a plan. I needed to weave some part, since as Ben put it. “We are a spinning and weaving company!” I could weave a ground for embroidery!

embroidered rose on cap
Detail of embroidered cap

Zoom Loom! Four inches by four inches I didn’t want to overcommit!

I can make a “lali-posh”. A small square embroidered as a cover for sweets in the Uzbek, Tadjik, and Sart cultures. The “lali-posh” is a dowry gift from the bride to the groom. Well, that didn’t exactly work for me, but the concept was perfect for a small textile I could actually accomplish.

I would weave the ground in cotton. Since my project was only a 4” x 4” square I chose a single Tulip surrounded in black with a traditional free flowing plant based design. Black and red are often pervasive in Uzbek designs, with beautiful blues, yellows, and greens highlighting the designs. Tulips are a highly stylized symbol, pervasive in Central Asian textiles, representing fertility. The common geography and climate create similarities between Colorado and Central Asia, leaving me with an affinity for the tulip also.

This project was about to put my weaving skills to the test. Complicated weave structures completely baffle me, I had to take a remedial weaving class, so with plain weave I figured I would be able to manage. HAHAHAHA!



Woven cotton Zoom Loom square

First came the issue of warping the Zoom Loom, the cotton I was using was a 10/2 we use for spinning wheel drive cords. I tried using the normal “Three-layer Warp Thread Setup” which didn’t work out. The sett was all wrong based on my yarn. I had to fill the warp with too many weft threads, which became overly complicated and an inadequate ground for embroidery. Although the finished piece had a nice hand it was time to start over.

It was then that the next book magically appeared between Denise and Ben’s desks. I leafed through it, and discovered the answer to conquer the sett issue on pp. 38-39: “Two-Layer Warp Thread Setup.” 100 Pin Loom Squares by Florencia Campos Correa (St. Martin’s Griffin) 2015 “The loom is threaded vertically in two layers of parallel threads before it is woven horizontally.” This way of warping the Zoom Loom creates an even structure to embroider upon.

The Zoom Loom as an embroidery hoop.
Use the Zoom Loom as an embroidery hoop

The Zoom Loom makes a very respectable embroidery hoop if flipped over, the weaving is framed quite nicely. Although embroidery is time consuming it served to soothe my soul during a particularly difficult time in my life. Perhaps the “lali-posh” soothes the bride to be while awaiting marriage. I drew out my design so I wouldn’t forget what it should look like. Choosing blue for what often might be black, purely based on my preference.

The chain stitch is heavily used in Central Asia, so it was time to learn. My grandmother had not gotten this far with my education in the domestic arts. Fortunately, we have YouTube. A couple minutes viewing the video and I had it down. Funny how the “domestic arts” are more appealing at fifty-six than at ten years of age. My dignity as a “tomboy” was no longer at stake. I could even learn to do a French knot through YouTube which I used in the border to highlight the running dog design.

The pins on the pin loom often catch the embroidery thread leaving loops. Manage this by placing tape over the pins so the embroidery thread is not constantly being caught. A friend mentioned this idea when I had finished most of the piece. Oh well!

When I had completely embroidered the framed space, I needed to remove it from the Zoom Loom. I wasn’t sure that the non-embroidered woven part would maintain its structural integrity because of the warp setup style I had used. My solution was to catch each stitch around the pins so that the selvedge would remain intact. This worked well. Allowing me to ease the piece off the loom. The stiffness of the embroidered area supported the non-embroidered edge until it could be finished. I bound the edge in a black running dog which frames the tulip. I used the French knot to finish off the interior dot as a simple embellishment.

Embroidered Zoom Loom Square


I am pleased with the finished piece. I just need to find a wonderful sweet to put under it, hmm, maybe a tiny slice of Double Chocolate Espresso Gluten Free Cake I had for my birthday would work. Sitting here daydreaming about traveling adventures in the “STANS” looking forward to my reward for hard “WORK” under the lali-posh.

-Cindy Lair

Cindy is the quality manager at Schacht Spindle Company, keeping our standards high. When Cindy isn’t maintaining quality at Schacht, she is hard at work as the President of WARP. You can find Cindy in the DVD “Know Your Wheel” where she shares her extensive knowledge of spinning wheels.

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

Patched Life – David Pipinich

Though the Zoom Loom is considered a small loom, projects of large scale are easily attainable. An art piece such as this wall hanging allows us to explore color and the meaning behind the crafts we love. We hope you enjoy this piece from our former intern David Pipinich as much as we do.

“Textiles is an art of precision and details, and for me this becomes a therapeutic process. I try to express the humor I find in everyday life by using colors and changing the ways my audience looks at common
objects.”- David Pipinich

Patched Life – 2013 – 44″ x 32″

This piece was made from small woven squares woven on the Zoom Loom and then crocheted together. They represent small fragments of memories pieced together to make up who I am. Each square has multiple colors spun together to show how a memory is never a solid thing, but ever changing.

Detail of Patched Life

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David Pipinich

David Pipinich is a student in textiles and art education at CSU in Ft. Collins, CO. David also interned with Schacht and provided weaving assistance for Jane Patrick and Sara Goldenberg’s new book, “Simple Woven Garments”.

Twill ZigZag Bag Squared – A Zoom Loom Project

 

With just a few squares, you can weave something that looks complex, but is actually quite easy. And in the end, you have a darling little bag, just the right size for your wallet and a few essentials.

These bags, designed and woven by Constance Hall, explore twill weave (the zig zag) on the Schacht Zoom Loom. We love the contrasting solid black with the graphic black and white–which is so in this spring. The links to the complete weaving and assembly instructions, as well as other fabulous Zoom Loom projects are below. Happy Weaving!

Difficulty rating: Medium

Size: Large bag, 8-1/2″ x 6-1/2″; Small bag, 5-1/2″ x 5″

Yarn: Malabrigo Worsted (100g/210yds); 63 Natural and 195 Black, 1 skein each.

Large bag: 162 yards black, 108 yards natural

Small Bag: 90 yards black, 54 yards natural

Other notions, equipment or tools: Sewing machine or needle and thread; 2 buttons for each bag; lining fabric; 4 Super magnets per bag

Overview: These small bags are woven with a Zoom Loom using a zig zag twill pattern. When weaving the black and natural squares make sure to warp with the same color each time. The solid black squares are woven with the zig zag twill pattern. You can use the twill zigzag pattern or plain weave. The bags are fulled gently by hand until the squares firm up. Too much felting will cause the twill pattern to be blurry. The closures used are magnets, but snaps or buttons and loops could be used.

Weaving


Large bag: Weave 3 black squares and 12 natural and black squares, using the zig zag twill pattern.

Small bag: Weave two black squares and 6 natural and black squares, using the zig zag twill pattern.

 

Weaving the ZigZag Twill

With natural yarn, warp the 1st layer as in the Zoom Loom instructions.
Turn the loom 180 degrees. Go around the 1st pin and warp this layer as in the Zoom Loom instructions for the third layer.
Break the yarn leaving a 3″ tail and tape the tail to the back of the loom, out of the way. Wrap black yarn around the outside of pins 9 times to measure yarn needed for weaving. Weave with the black yarn as follows:
Row 1: [U1, O1] straight across, Go around the bottom corner pin to lock the yarn down. Back through large space.

Row 2: [O2, U2] across, ending with U1

Row 3: O1, U1, [O2, U2] across, ending with O1

Row 4: [U2, O2] across, ending with O1

Row 5: U1, O1, [U2, O2] across, ending with U1

Row 6: [O2, U2] across, ending with U1

Row 7: O1, U1, [O2, U2] across, ending with O1

Row 8: [U2, O2] across, ending with O1

Row 9: U1, O1, [U2, O2] across, ending with U1

Row 10: [O2, U2] across, ending with U1

Row 11: O1, U1, [O2, U2] across, ending with O1

Switch twill direction here

Row 12: U1, O1, [U2, O2] across, ending with U1

Row 13: [O2, U2] across, ending with U1

Row 14: O1, U1, [O2, U2] across, ending with O1

Row 15: [U2, O2] across, ending with O1

Row 16: U1, O1, [U2, O2] across, ending with U1

Row 17: [O2, U2] across, ending with U1

Row 18: O1, U1, [O2, U2] across, ending with O1

Row 19: [U2, O2] across, ending with O1

Row 20: U1, O1, [U2, O2] across, ending with U1

Row 21: [O2, U2] across, ending with U1

Row 22: O1, U1, [O2, U2] across, ending with O1

Change back to the original twill direction

Row 23: U1, O1, [U2, O2] across, ending with U1

Row 24: [O2, U2] across, ending with U1

Row 25: O1, U1, [O2, U2] across, ending with O1

Row 26: [U2, O2] across, ending with O1

Row 27: U1, O1, [U2, O2] across, ending with U1

Row 28: [O2, U2] across, ending with U1

Row 29: O1, U1, [O2, U2] across, ending with O1

Row 30: [U2, O2] across, ending with O1

Row 31: U1, O1, [U2, O2] across, ending with U1

Row 32: O1, [U2, O2} across ending with U2

It’s not necessary to change the direction of the twill with the all black squares.
Assembly: Arrange the squares in a rectangle 3 squares across by 5 squares down. Place all black squares across the top, with the beginning yarn tails at top left corners and the ending yarn tails at the top right corners [A]. Make sure the zig zag pattern is flowing from one square to the next. Sew the squares together using a very small seam allowance, either on the sewing machine or by hand.

Fulling: Wash the sewn rectangle in hot water with a little dish soap. Agitate for a few minutes, then check the amount of felting. The fabric should thicken, but not shrink much. Repeat the agitation until done. Do not overdo or the twill pattern will be blurred. Rinse to remove soap, then roll in a towel to remove water. Straighten the sides and lay flat to dry.

Finishing: Cut the lining fabric 1/4″ smaller than the felted rectangle. If using magnets, cut 4 small rectangles 1″ x 2″ or big enough to fit your magnets. Fold the small rectangles in half and pin onto the wrong side of the lining. Place two magnets at the top and two at the bottom [B]. Line them up so when the bag is folded the magnets will connect. Sew three sides of the small rectangles to the lining, insert the magnets and then stitch the last side.

Place the lining on the fulled rectangle with right sides together. The lining is slightly smaller than the fabric. Line up one long side and sew using the smallest seam allowance possible [C]. Sew the sides in the order shown in [C], stretching the lining over to meet the edge of the fulled rectangle. Leave the bottom edge unsewn.

Turn the bag right side out. On the unsewn side, fold the edges of the lining and fulled fabric to the inside and hand stitch the edge closed.
With the lining outside, fold up the bottom of the bag to align the bottom edge almost to the spot where the black squares start [D]. Hand sew the side seams and turn the bag right side out. Fold the black end over to form a flap and sew on decorative buttons.

Optional handle: Cast on 5 stitches and knit I-cord to the length desired. Bind off and sew the handle onto the lining on the inside of the bag.

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Constance Hall

My Zoom Loom Gave To Me – Day 12

On the twelfth day of Christmas, my Zoom Loom gave to me.

Twelve Candy Twists

Eleven Christmas Elves

Ten Evergreen Dreams

Nine Precious Presents

Eight Holiday Hollies

Seven Sweet Things

Six Tiny Gift Bags

Five Dazzling Diamonds

Four Chillin’ Snowmen

Three Snow Birds

Two Santa Socks

One Star Tree Topper on the tree.

This concludes the Zoom Loom Ornament Weave Along!

Thank you for participating, and may these ornaments brighten up your 2014-2015 winter! See if your local dealer will be holding an event during December, or weave along at home! Post pictures on our Facebook, and chat with others on our thread on Ravelry!

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Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

My Zoom Loom Gave To Me – Day 11

On the eleventh day of Christmas, my Zoom Loom gave to me…

11 Christmas Elves

Introducing the Zoom Loom Ornament Weave Along!

Every day from November 24th to December 4th, we will be unveiling a new Zoom Loom ornament pattern on our blog!

See if your local dealer will be holding an event during December, or weave along at home! Post pictures on our Facebook, and chat with others on our thread on Ravelry!

  google+  pinterest  ravelry  twitter  youtube

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

Candy Twist

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

My Zoom Loom Gave To Me – Day 9

On the ninth day of Christmas, my Zoom Loom gave to me…

Nine Precious Presents

Introducing the Zoom Loom Ornament Weave Along!

Every day from November 24th to December 4th, we will be unveiling a new Zoom Loom ornament pattern on our blog!

See if your local dealer will be holding an event during December, or weave along at home! Post pictures on our Facebook, and chat with others on our thread on Ravelry!

  google+  pinterest  ravelry  twitter  youtube

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

My Zoom Loom Gave To Me – Day 8

On the eight day of Christmas, my Zoom Loom gave to me…

Eight Holiday Hollies

Introducing the Zoom Loom Ornament Weave Along!

Every day from November 24th to December 4th, we will be unveiling a new Zoom Loom ornament pattern on our blog!

See if your local dealer will be holding an event during December, or weave along at home! Post pictures on our Facebook, and chat with others on our thread on Ravelry!

  google+  pinterest  ravelry  twitter  youtube

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

My Zoom Loom Gave to Me – Day 7

On the seventh day of Christmas, my Zoom Loom gave to me…

Seven Sweet Things

Introducing the Zoom Loom Ornament Weave Along!

Every day from November 24th to December 4th, we will be unveiling a new Zoom Loom ornament pattern on our blog!

See if your local dealer will be holding an event during December, or weave along at home! Post pictures on our Facebook, and chat with others on our thread on Ravelry!

  google+  pinterest  ravelry  twitter  youtube

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

My Zoom Loom Gave To Me – Day 6

On the sixth day of Christmas, my Zoom Loom gave to me…

Six Tiny Gift Bags

Introducing the Zoom Loom Ornament Weave Along!

Every day from November 24th to December 4th, we will be unveiling a new Zoom Loom ornament pattern on our blog!

See if your local dealer will be holding an event during December, or weave along at home! Post pictures on our Facebook, and chat with others on our thread on Ravelry!

  google+  pinterest  ravelry  twitter  youtube

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

My Zoom Loom Gave To Me – Day 5

On the fifth day of Christmas, my Zoom Loom gave to me…

 Five Dazzling Diamonds

Introducing the Zoom Loom Ornament Weave Along!

Every day from November 24th to December 4th, we will be unveiling a new Zoom Loom ornament pattern on our blog!

See if your local dealer will be holding an event during December, or weave along at home! Post pictures on our Facebook, and chat with others on our thread on Ravelry!

  google+  pinterest  ravelry  twitter  youtube

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

My Zoom Loom Gave To Me – Day 4

On the fourth day of Christmas, my Zoom Loom gave to me…

Four Chillin’ Snowmen

Introducing the Zoom Loom Ornament Weave Along!

Every day from November 24th to December 4th, we will be unveiling a new Zoom Loom ornament pattern on our blog!

See if your local dealer will be holding an event during December, or weave along at home! Post pictures on our Facebook, and chat with others on our thread on Ravelry!

  google+  pinterest  ravelry  twitter  youtube

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

My Zoom Loom Gave To Me – Day 3

On the third day of Christmas, my Zoom Loom gave to me…

Three Snow Birds!


Introducing the Zoom Loom Ornament Weave Along!

Every day from November 24th to December 4th, we will be unveiling a new Zoom Loom ornament pattern on our blog!

See if your local dealer will be holding an event during December, or weave along at home! Post pictures on our Facebook, and chat with others on our thread on Ravelry!

  google+  pinterest  ravelry  twitter  youtube

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

My Zoom Loom Gave To Me – Day 1

On the first day of Christmas, my Zoom Loom Gave to me…

One Star Tree Topper on the tree.

Introducing the Zoom Loom Ornament Weave-Along!

Every day from November 24th to December 4th, we will be unveiling a new Zoom Loom ornament pattern on our blog!

Check to see if your local dealer will be holding a weave-along event during December, or just join us in weaving along at home! We’ll look for your creations when you post them on our Facebook page. You can also chat with others on our thread on Ravelry!

  google+  pinterest  ravelry  twitter  youtube

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

The Holly and the Ivy Wreath–A Zoom Loom holiday project

Every now and again we have a project here at Schacht that many hands are involved in. This wreath project was one of those “whole village” efforts.

It all started with our summer intern, Chase Ford, weaving all of the Zoom Loom squares and making the florets. However, when it was time for his internship to be over, the wreath was not yet finished. The wreath then passed to me, Benjamin, where I wrapped the wreath form and placed the “leaves” while Jane worked on making miniature yarn balls. Finally, Judy (a pro wreath-maker) helped oversee the placement of the decorations.

This was truly a fun community effort, and we encourage you to make a wreath with your family or friends this season.

Supplies:
Schacht Zoom Loom
A 14″ wreath form
Sport weight wool yarn in 4 colors of green, and 1 color of red.
We used Brown Sheep Nature Spun in Spring Green (109S), Arctic Moss (N20), Limestone (144), Grecian Olive (104), and Red Fox (N46)
Floral pins
Straight pins.
Optional: Needle felting needle or fabric glue.

Mixed green ball in Grecian Olive, Limestone and Spring Green.

Start by first wrapping your wreath form in Spring Green, Limestone, and Grecian Olive. To make this easier, wind the three colors together on a ball winder into a small, palm-sized ball.

This process is an essential step for saving time.

To start the wrapping process, hold the tail of the yarn down and wrap a few wraps around the tail to keep it in place. Then continue around the form, covering it in its entirety. Pin the end of the yarn down to secure it.

 

The wrapped form looks more organic when using multiple colors together

Using this tutorial, make 14 florets each of Spring Green, Limestone, and Grecian Olive and 7 florets in Arctic Moss.

Using the floral pins, put one leg through the floret and then push the floret to the top of the two legs. It helped to do this step completely before moving on to the pinning step.

Start pinning with the Spring Green as your first pin, then the Limestone, and then the Grecian Olive. Alternating these three colors, pinning them around the form about 1.5″ – 2″ apart, changing the placement on the form for a lively effect.

After you place all of the dark to mid value greens, place the 7 Arctic Moss florets evenly around the form, nestling them into any space that looks slightly bare.

To make the balls, wind some yarn into a ball. Then, using a needle felting needle, tack the end down into the ball. Tack yarns around the ball as needed to hold them into place. This can also be done with a dab of fabric glue.

A multitude of red balls of yarn. Use multiple colors for a more yarn-y wreath.

Make 5 balls that are approximately ping-pong ball size, and then make about 20 more balls varying in marble size and smaller.

Using straight pins, pin these to the form in a visually pleasing manner.

Add a loop of yarn to the back of the form to hang.

Brown Sheep Nature Spun has been moth-proofed, and can be stored in a wreath container without further moth-proofing measures.

When you make a wreath of your own, share it with us on our social media!

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

Pumpkin Pin Cushion

I am not much of a sewing fanatic, but I do like having pins around when I do sew. I also love the Fall season, so I decided to make my sewing more festive by making a pumpkin pin cushion!

This project takes a total of 5 squares, some fiber-fil, and a hint of crochet.

Weave 4 orange squares and 1 green square with the Schacht Zoom Loom.

Sew the 4 orange squares into one larger square. Gather threads in each corner and cinch up into a pouch shape. Stuff this shape with some fiber-fil and tie the opening shut.

With the green square, follow the instructions found here for making a leaf.

Attach the leaf to the top of the pumpkin by slip-stitching with some green yarn. Chain stitch 10 stitches, then single crochet 2 in each chain stitch. Bind off and weave in any ends.

Wash your pumpkin to full.

Use it as a pin cushion, or make a few for some Fall decorations.

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Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

Bolster Squared – A Zoom Loom Project

Here’s a comfy bolster to lean on while you’re weaving on your Zoom Loom! This project is quick to weave, using only 20 squares with a bit of sewing and knitting to finish it off. Customize it to fit your decorating scheme! Don’t forget to share your projects with us on our social media!

Make a bolster to match your decor

Download the PDF.
View our other Zoom Loom projects.

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Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

Back to School – Benji’s Back Pack

When thinking about back to school projects for this blog series, I thought back to my days in elementary school (see picture below) and what was most important to me then. Being a rambunctious and active kid, my back pack was the item that got some of the most abuse, so every July, my mother would take me to pick out a new back pack. Besides the art supplies, that was my favorite item to pick out.

After I spun my yarn for one of our tutorial posts, I immediately wanted to make something big and functional with the finished yarn. As I pondered the pattern, I figured that a bag of some sort would be perfect! I have seen a lot of purses, clutches, small bags, etc. but haven’t seen many large bags or back packs. I love when two ideas come together in this manner. I also knew that I wanted a sturdy bag, so I decided on fulling the bag heavily, nearly felting it.

After weaving 20 squares with my Zoom Loom, I realized that I wanted to weave the rest of the fabric for the bag on my 15″ Cricket Loom to maximize the use of my yardage.

Yarn: I used about  400 yds worth of handspun Merino yarn that approximates out to a worsted weight yarn.
Using a sheep’s wool yarn for this project will make it felt more. Take this into consideration when making the final piece. You may need to adjust measurements to create the right size bag for your purposes

Weaving: Weave 20 squares with the Zoom Loom. Seam them together using a whip stitch in the following configurations:

Make two of these, they will be side panels.
This will be the flap of the bag (Large Zoom Loom Panel)

On the Cricket, warp your loom with 46″ inches of yarn 12″ wide using an 8 dent reed. Weave about 38″-40″. I lashed on the front of my warp so I had much less loom waste. Hemstitch both ends of the fabric, then fold over half an inch on the edge twice and hand sew it down. This will leave you with a piece of fabric just under 12″ wide and 36″ long.

Weave the strap material by measuring a warp 2 yards long and 2 inches wide in an 8 dent reed on the Cricket loom. Weave as much length as possible, as you want the strap to be a custom fit when you sew them on to the bag. Finish the ends of the strap the same way as the body of the bag fabric.

Constructing the Bag: start by hand sewing the large Zoom Loom panel to the end of the Cricket panel. This will create a piece of fabric around 52″ long and about 12″ wide (minus shrinkage).
Then line up the pieces as follows:

Flattened view of all pieces before stitching.

Seam the pieces together as they are positioned in the above diagram, then continue seaming the body of the bag (cricket woven panel) to the sides of the bag.
There will be an extra 4 inches of the body of the bag, seam those to the top edge of the side. This will leave an opening large enough to put items into the bag, but won’t cause the items to fall out when the bag is handled.

Attach the ends of the strap to the bottom edge of the back pack, tack the straps to the top of the bag at a location that is comfortable for you. This should leave just enough strap fabric to create a small hand hold at the top of the bag.

Full, or lightly felt the bag to create a stronger more dense fabric. Add closures of your choice and fill with your books, or in my case yarn and fiber!

I sewed a button on the front to hide the back of a magnetic closure

Other optional choices would be to make pockets out of Zoom Loom squares and sew them on, to add storage to your bag.

20 years between these photos – no change right?

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Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

Zoom Loom Wedding Favors

By the time you read this post, I will be out of the office and getting ready for my wedding. I hope you enjoy this post while I enjoy my honeymoon.

When it came time to start thinking about making wedding favors for our wedding, my fiancee and I thought for quite some time before we came up with what we wanted to do. We wanted something handmade and personal; something that would mean a lot to us and to our guests.
Last year for the Spring TNNA trade show, Schacht made little flowers from Zoom Loom squares and a little pin button.

We decided to personalize our flowers by using our initials and wedding date, and by adding a little magnet to the back to create a fridge magnet for our guests.

Photo Courtesy of Blue Sky Alpacas

We used Melange from Blue Sky Alpacas in three colors that coordinated with our wedding colors. We broke out our Zoom Looms and started weaving the hours away.

“Are we done yet?”

Over 100 squares later, and a lot of help from the Schacht office staff, we were ready to assemble them.
I started by making each square into a flower, then attached the pin to the center of the flower, and glued a magnet to the back of each flower using a low-heat hot glue gun.

Piles and piles of squares all over!

The greatest thing about this project is that it can be done in a relatively short amount of time, and you can customize the colors for your own wedding or event. (It also gets your loved ones weaving!)

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Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.

Cotton Candy Purse – Denise Renee Grace


I love working with color and texture in simple form, and art yarn lends itself well to this formula. Knit Collage has some great yarns with amazing color and texture! It is handspun by women in India so it also supports a great cause. For this bag, I chose Pixie Dust in Azalea Boom for the weft, which is a core spun thick and thin with glitz, and Maharani silk in Firework for the warp and the strap. It is bright, luscious, and happy.

Warping the loom: Warp the full width of an 8 dent reed on a 10” Cricket loom (80 ends). Using the warp yarn, weave a 1 1/2″ hem, then move on to the thick and thin using a firm beat. End the piece with another 1 1/2″ hem. Including the hems, the finished length is about 30” making the measured warp about 60” long – this accounts for loom waste and take-up.

Detail of the thick and thin weft

The strap of the bag is an inkle band woven with the Maharani Silk in Firework for both the warp and weft. The set-up is 35 warp threads, starting and ending with heddled warp threads. The finished band measures approximately 3.5 feet long.

Detail of the inkle band strap.

Construction of the bag: Fold the hems in twice and tack the edge down with a whip stitch in a coordinating color of sewing thread. Fold the bottom edge up about 7.5″ and whip stitch along the sides to join. Using some fabric, sew a small liner to fit inside this newly formed cavity. Whip stitch the fabric to the woven piece.

Detail of front of bag attachment of the strap  Detail of back of bag attachment of the strap

To attach the inkle strap, fold the raw end of the strap under itself, and line up the folded edge with the flap of the purse. Position this strap approximately 1″ away from the side edge of the flap. Sew this strap down by stitching the sides down into the woven fabric, again with a whip stitch. Where the strap meets the top of the flap, straight stitch three lines to help secure and fortify the connection. The other end of the strap can be attached about inch down on the back side of the purse using three rows of straight stitch.

This bag is the perfect size for your Zoom Loom!

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Denise Renee Grace

Denise Renee Grace first learned to weave as a student at Bethel College. She later moved to Boulder and worked in a re-purposed product company where Barry Schacht discovered her and hired her to work in our sales and service department. Denise’s first love is spinning and she is especially fond of working with natural fibers on all four of her Schacht Wheels. When it comes to weaving, tabby tickles her. In charge of customer care, Denise spends her days here helping people—something she does so well.

Winner of the Spring Zoom Loom Doll Challenge

We asked Spring Zoom Loom Doll Winner “HotAfricanQueen” a few questions about her Doll!

What a relaxing scene

What is your name?“Chantal Hoareau”

Where are you from? “Born in Africa, I now make Los Angeles, California my home.”

How long have you been weaving?“I have only been weaving since March 2014. This is the 1st loom I have ever worked with consistently.”

What drew you to the Zoom Loom? “I am a tool-gal. I am always looking for new tools to use or hone a skill. When I saw the Zoom Loom at Stitches West 2014, I immediately saw the potential it had—so I had to get it. I am glad the vendor selling it had a partially worked project on it. That is what drew me to the loom.”

What other fiber arts do you do? “Knitting & Crochet”

What was the inspiration behind this doll?“I ended up working on the environment first, then the doll much later. Inspiration happened while I was on a coffee run one spring morning. I stopped to observe a newly planted flower bed that was facing the sidewalk. Their classic spring colors were a welcome sight from the dreary winter colors. Even in California. Tall and short flowers, some open and others still, others partially open, yet others almost shyly, closed shut. The still-shut flowers reminded me that Mother Nature un-folds flowers to show them off. It occurred to me that I could possibly reverse the process by folding a flower into place. I thought this would be a good experiment to try some origami using the Zoom Loom squares. My experiments revealed that regular yarn did not match my perception—it created too much bulk for what I had in mind. So I moved onto finer, thread yarn and came up with a lace origami flower! It took me a weekend to fine-tune the process as I wanted to include as many flower components as possible from 1 (one) completed Zoom Loom square. In the end, I succeeded in making them small enough to include petals, stamen, pistil and stem. To keep the idea fresh, I wrote up a pattern that is now posted among my Ravelry projects. The flowers were done by April. These served as inspiration for the dress for the doll when I decided to use the same yarns as the flowers. Fun project!”

What yarns do you prefer to use? “Cotton”

Do you have plans for the next doll?“I am still toying with ideas for the summer doll. There are so many sources of inspiration. A friend even gave me the idea of a dancing Hawaiian girl!”

If you could have one super-power what would it be? “Erase all hatred and greed”
Thank you to everyone who participated in this round! If you would like to participate in the Summer Doll Challenge, pop on over to the Ravelry thread!

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Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets)--so he's a great mix of data and creativity--all wonderful traits as a member of our sales team. You'll often hear his friendly voice on the phone and you've probably noticed his name pop up in many places: Ravelry, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube. Ben is our digital media manager—the main reason you've seen more activity from us in social media.