If My Old Favorite Jeans Were a Scarf – Anzula Luxury Fibers Collaboration

wrapped

As it turns out, this is now my very favorite go-to scarf! It’s the perfect blend – being both casual and decadent – and oh so cozy! The fringe treatment adds a subtle element – not unlike the frayed edges of your favorite well-worn jeans.

 

What you need

Schacht Cricket loom

Cricket 8-dent rigid heddle reed

2-15” pick-up sticks

1 stick shuttle

1 Schacht Incredible Rope Machine

 

Yarn

Warp: Anzula Cricket (80% Superwash Merino/10% cashmere/10% nylon; +/- 250 yds) in Denim, approx. 238 yds

Warp length: 107”, allows for 12” of fringe, take-up and loom waste.

Warp Ends: 80

Width in reed: 10”

EPI: 8

 

Weft: Anzula Cricket (80% Superwash Merino/10% cashmere/10% nylon; +/- 250yds) in Denim, approx. 190 yds

PPI: 8

 

Ropes: Anzula Dreamy (75% Superwash Merino/15% cashmere/10% nylon; +/- 385 yds) in Denim, approx. ­­­­150 yds.

Using the Dreamy, make 5-6 strand ropes prior to warping, Set the distance at 4 ½ yds from rope machine to separator. Do not use the Cricket yarn for the ropes or they will be too thick for the slots in the reed.

 

Weaving

Using the direct warping method and the Anzula Cricket yarn, measure 80 ends. Then add the ropes in the 8th, 16th, 28th, 44th, and 72nd slots tying them individually to the back apron bar. Continue warping the loom and when moving ends in the reed be sure to keep all of the ropes in a slots along with one of the ends of Cricket yarn.

Begin the piece with hemstitching (see The Weaver’s Idea Book by Jane Patrick for instructions).

The balance of the piece is primarily plain weave with random pick-up areas of the ropes. The warps are woven as warp floats. I varied the way in which I picked them up, some float areas incorporate all rope ends, in other areas I might pick up just one or two ropes and allow these to float on top.

For rope warp pick-up, use a Cricket pick-up stick behind the heddle and pick up all of the ropes but not the additional end in these slots. This will isolate the rope warps and make them easy to pick up as you are weaving. Use the second pick-up stick to select random rope warp floats.

The warp pick-up weaving sequence is:

Row 1: up and pick-up stick

Row 2: down

Repeat for the desired length of the warp float.

Alternate solid plain weave with random pick-up as desired. End the weaving with hemstitching.

rope details

Finishing

Remove from the loom and trim the single ends of the fringe to approximately 6””. Keep the ropes longer than the other ends for now and secure each rope with a knot. Hand wash in warm water and roll in a towel to remove excess water. Put in a dryer and full to the desired hand, being sure to check the progress, approximately every 5 minutes. Lay flat for the remainder of the drying time.

The single end fringe will be fuzzy at the ends. Trim these evenly across keeping some of the frizzy part. Adjust the ropes to be the same length as the rest of the fringe, by securing them with a knot and trimming.

Finished length with fringe: 64”

Finished fringe length: approximately 4 ½”

Finished width: 8”

fringe detail

 

Anzula started with a passion. Owner Sabrina Famellos sold her crafty goods at shows all along the California coast. When she couldn’t find a steady supply of dyed goods that were up to her standards, she started doing the dyeing herself. In 2008, this became her fulltime focus. Since then, her one-woman operation has grown into a team of eleven, an assemblage of women and men with backgrounds as diverse as Anzula’s 100+ colorways. Anzula’s broad range of colors includes everything from earthy to neon, pastels to jewel tones. Sabrina’s precision in the dye room produces consistent hand dyed results. Anzula starts with yarns that are chosen for their heirloom quality, focusing on luxurious fibers such as cashmere, camel, silk, linen, alpaca, yak, and milk protein. The North American mill that supplies the undyed yarn sources the materials and spins

Judy Pagels

Judy Pagels comes to Schacht from a varied background in printing, graphic design, and flower arranging. Hired initially as our shipping manager, Judy shortly afterwards was promoted to sales and service manager where she is in charge of new accounts, as well as sales and service. Judy is first a knitter, but also weaves and spins—always with a keen eye to great design.