My Story: Kyle Kunnecke

Kyle was one of our grand prize winners for the Personal Stories Contest, you can see his story in the Spring 2016 issue of Spin-Off. Kyle has released the free knitting pattern for the Hayden Cowl that can be seen in the advertisement. Here are the photos that you won’t see in the article, and you can see what a joy he is!

 

A curious learning journey

My alarm buzzes and beeps, and as I snooze my way into a new day, I see my Wolf Pup loom waiting patiently. My Sidekick greets me with anticipation, anxious to go on a trip; knowing it fits perfectly into my luggage when we journey cross-country to a fiber arts retreat.

Kunnecke-Schacht

When I first learned to knit, I found its repetitive rhythm meditative and knew I wanted to learn more about other fiber arts and how they might influence my knitting. In the beginning, spinning and weaving felt complicated and unattainable, but I was continuously reminded that the textile arts hold a never-ending opportunity for creative expression—if I just give myself the gift of time, seek guidance, and am patient with myself. As I learned more, my interests expanded to dyeing yarns and roving, to weaving, and eventually, to spinning. I found the processes of spinning and weaving, like knitting, created a feeling of comfort, meditation, and calm. I find at each turn new curiosities about fiber herds, processing fleece, and the preservation of rare breed sheep.

In other cultures the story begins at the beginning, with caring for a flock, cleaning and carding wool, then progresses to spinning, weaving, and/or knitting. This dichotomy fascinates and inspires me. I think about the talented hands of other civilizations and how knitted or woven pieces are used to show rank, convey emotion, and tell stories. I find the process of spinning meditative, and am hypnotized by the magic of twisting singles into a plied yarn.

Kunnecke_Handspun-Handwoven Scarf

My most recent obsession has been learning about rare and threatened sheep breeds, the symbolism in Navajo tapestry weaving, and how cultures use knitting and weaving in their traditions. I’m lucky enough to have a craft studio where my reference library, collection of tools, and bountiful materials provide inspiration. I learned early on to invest in quality tools so the process is as lovely as the finished product. My favorite tools and most treasured artifacts, however, take residence in my bedroom. My Sidekick and Wolf Pup are among the last things I see each evening; standing guard as I doze off to sleep after another day of discovery.

-Kyle Kunnecke

Kyle Kunnecke is a designer, maker, teacher, author, and volunteer. He believes that creativity has the power to heal and has been involved in using fiber arts as a tool to combat depression and anxiety. Kyle lives in San Francisco.

www.kylewilliam.com

Schacht Spindle

Schacht Spindle Company, Inc. was founded during the back-to-earth movement of the late 1960's and its accompanying craft resurgence. Their first loom was a simple tapestry loom, a version which they still make today. Over nearly 50 years, Schacht has developed a broad range of high quality hand weaving and hand spinning tools, including their popular Cricket Loom and Ladybug Spinning wheel. Schacht’s mission is to create beautiful and well-designed products that enhance customers’ weaving and spinning experience through innovative problem solving, creative ideas, skilled woodworking and craftsmanship, and friendly, knowledgeable customer service. Schacht’s family owned business is located in Boulder, Colorado.