Ruched Centerpiece – Benjamin Krudwig

Every holiday in my childhood home was a spectacle. Seasonal decorations went up all over the house; no room was left untouched by the festive frock. To me, the table has always been the place where people come together, so it’s no wonder that I am drawn to making home-goods that belong on the dinner table.

As I was pondering this project, I knew that I wanted to make a centerpiece that would provide a textured backdrop for the rest of the Valentine’s Day decorations.

To start, weave 9 Zoom Loom squares. They could all be the same color (as shown) or they could be an assortment of colors. For this project, I used Neota Designs yarn, 50% Wool, 50% Silk, in the “Colorado Red” color-way. The silk added a decadent touch to this project, perfect for the season of romance.

Arrange the squares in a 3 x 3 grid, and seam them together. It is probably best to sew the squares together as opposed to crochet them together to eliminate as much extra bulk as possible.

Starting on one of the corners, pull the center vertical thread causing a gather or ruche. Cut that thread in half and tie the ends together in a double knot to prevent it from coming undone.


Alternate the direction (vertical or horizontal) of the thread that you pull on each square.

Pulling a horizontal thread in square 2.

Snip the tied ends close to the work to clean up the back of the piece. Gently wash the centerpiece, and lay flat to dry.

This project was fun and quick to make, and would be great in a larger scale. Ruching is an easy way to add a little bit of texture to piece of otherwise plain fabric. This project could easily be adapted to any time of the year, and if you choose a color scheme that matches your decor, it could be featured year-round. Make your own handwoven ruched fabric, send us photos on our Facebook and Twitter, and we may feature them!

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Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin has a double degree in biology and photography (he also spins, weaves, knits and crochets.) His work can be seen in Handwoven, Spin-Off and the SIP Easy Weaving With Little Looms.