3 Incredible Rope Home Decor Projects

As you read in our January e-Newes, our theme for January is “what was old is new” and in this post, we’re breathing new life into three vintage decor ideas. For all of these easy projects, you’ll need yarn and an Incredible Rope Machine. For instructions on how to use the Incredible Rope Machine, check out our video.

Ombre Macrame Wall Hanging

 

Macrame has returned to the DIY and home decor sphere with force, and millennials everywhere are “re-discovering” this funky trend. Modernize the look by incorporating ombre, another design trend that is still hot.

For this project you’ll be making 8 ropes with 8/2 unmercerized cotton weaving yarn. For our sample we used Algiers Blue (AB) and Lime (L) from Valley Yarns. This technique works best with yarns that are high in contrast in value or color.

Make your ropes about 2 yards (1.8 meters) long with the following “recipes.”

One pass is a complete round following the winding diagram in the instructions.

7 passes of AB

6 passes of AB and 1 pass of L

5 passes of AB and 2 passes of L

4 passes of AB and 3 passes of L

3 passes of AB and 4 passes of L

2 passes of AB and 5 passes of L

1 pass of AB and 6 passes of L

6 passes of L

Fold your ropes in half, make a slip knot and slip them onto your dowel in order from AB to L.

At this point, you can play with your macrame design however you want. Macrame is generally meant to be symmetrical and orderly, however, it can make quite an impact if you leave things a little irregular.

 

After finishing our macrame section, we wove a panel, interlacing the ropes from one half of the hanging with the other half.

 

We then unraveled each rope into the three strands and braided them, inserting beads periodically for added interest.

Freeform Coiled Rope Mat

Here’s another blast from the past, coiled rugs! This project turns the traditional craft on its head.

You’ll need multiple ropes of varying lengths. This project is great for using up scrap yarns, the only must, is that each rope should be about the same thickness. However, ropes of slightly varying thicknesses will add a texture to your finished mat/rug.

For our sample we used one ball of Caron Big Cakes, and separated each of the color repeats. We then took each color and created a single pass rope with the entire length, adjusting the distance to the separator as needed. Most of our ropes ended up being approximately 4.3 yards (3.6 meters) long. In total, our mat used 23.5 yards (21.4 meters) of rope.

Beginning with one color, make a spiral coil, and using a simple whip-stitch, sew the “back” of the ropes together. Add some folds and bumps and spirals here and there to create a free-form shape. Keep going with this process, until you’ve used the second to last color or rope. Then with the final color, follow along the edges to finish off the mat/rug.

Make this project as small or large as you want! Our finished mat measures 26″ (66cm) wide and 17″ (43cm) tall.

 

Color Pop Knotted Plant Hanger

Knotted plant hangers were all the rage in the late 60s and 70s. Traditional macrame was done with jute twine or some other natural colored fiber. For this update¬†we’re not updating the form, we’re updating the look by using yarn that will add a pop of color to any space.

For this project, you’ll need 3 ropes (in a color that coordinates with your decor scheme) that are each 2 yards (1.8 meters) long.

Fold all three ropes in half, gather them together in a bundle and tie them in an overhand knot.

Measure down to where you want the top of your potted plant to be. Take a pair of ropes and tie a square knot. Repeat this process for the other pairs. Then, create new pairs by taking one rope from each knot and measure down to the bottom of your potted plant and tie another square knot. Repeat this process for the other pairs.

Bring all of these ropes together and gather them at the center of the bottom of the pot and tie them in an over hand knot.

You can make this project in any color that you want. You could even make the three ropes in three different colors.

If you make any of these projects, let us know on Instagram by tagging your post with #schachtspindle, we’d love to see your makes!

Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin is the Content Manager at Schacht, and loves creating weaving and spinning content for the Schacht blog. His other spinning and weaving work can be seen in Handwoven, Spin-Off and the SIP Easy Weaving With Little Looms. You may find him on Instagram as @benjamin_krudwig