Barry’s Jubilee Weave Along – Warping the Skwoosh Scarf

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I’ve always loved the Skwoosh scarf that my co-author Stephanie Flynn Sokolov designed for our book Woven Scarves. I used her initial design as a jumping off point for our weave along scarf, using some of the same yarns from Mountain Colors that Stephanie used for her scarf, but changing the colorway to correspond with our 50th Anniversary colors. I worked with Mountain Colors to create a custom painted warp yarn in their delightful Twizzle yarn (a dream to weave with). We combined this with Merino Ribbon in the warp and used their crepe yarn for weft. These yarns are just a joy to weave with. The scarf is easy to warp and weave and the finishing brings it all together. We’ll talk about this transformation later in our Weave Along.

In this initial blog, we provide step-by-step warping instructions, which is the same technique shown in Woven Scarves.

We’ve made the project up into a Weave Along Scarf Kit, which is available on our website. Single skeins of our custom Twizzle yarn are also available.

For this project, you will need a rigid heddle loom with at least a 15″ weaving width, and an 8-dent reed. We used a 15″ Cricket, however a Flip Loom would also be a good choice! Get the yarn kit here.

Yarn Requirements:
1 skein (240 yards/219 meters) Twizzle in the Barry’s Jubilee color or other Worsted equivalent.

1/2 skein (115 yards/205 meters) Merino Ribbon in the Red Willow color or other Bulky equivalent.

1/4 skein (315 yards/288 meters) Wool Crepe in the Hummingbird color or other Fingering equivalent.

Step 1: Wind all of the skeins into balls. You will use Twizzle and Merino Ribbon for the warp.

Step 2: Set your warping peg 102″ away from the apron rod. Secure your loom to the table with the back facing away from the peg.

Step 3: find the center of the reed and measure over to the edge half the warp width. The warp for this project is 13 1/4″ wide, so half the distance is 6 2/3″.

Step 4: Begin with Twizzle, tying it to the back apron rod. From the other side of the reed, draw a loop through the slot at the edge of your scarf, and place it around the peg. There will be two warp threads in the slot.

Step 5: Take the warp around the apron rod and then through the next slot, and around the peg as before. You will thread three slots with Twizzle. Skip two slots and then thread three slots, repeat for a total of 11 times. Tie off the end on the apron rod.

Step 6: Tie the Merino Ribbon onto the apron bar and thread each of the two empty slots in between the slots threaded with Twizzle. When all of the spaces are filled, tie off the end on the apron bar.

 

Step 7: Cut the loop at the peg, and tie a loose overhand knot.

Step 8: Wind on to the back beam, using a sturdy paper to separate the layers. Tighten up the warp as you go by pulling on the paper every round or so. Wind until the end of the warp is about 10″ from the heddle.

Step 9: Thread the heddle. Take one end out of the slot and thread it in the adjacent hole. Repeat until all the threads are threaded in the heddle

Step 10: Tie onto the front apron rod in groups of about 1″. I like to tie a knot in the center of the apron rod first to keep the apron rod from tipping. Tie using a surgeon’s knot. Adjust the tension and then secure with a bow tie. You are ready to weave!

We will get into the weaving and finishing instructions next week!

Schacht Spindle

Schacht Spindle Company, Inc. was founded during the back-to-earth movement of the late 1960's and its accompanying craft resurgence. Their first loom was a simple tapestry loom, a version which they still make today. Over nearly 50 years, Schacht has developed a broad range of high quality hand weaving and hand spinning tools, including their popular Cricket Loom and Ladybug Spinning wheel. Schacht’s mission is to create beautiful and well-designed products that enhance customers’ weaving and spinning experience through innovative problem solving, creative ideas, skilled woodworking and craftsmanship, and friendly, knowledgeable customer service. Schacht’s family owned business is located in Boulder, Colorado.