Cricket Creations – Noreen Crone-Findlay

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Noreen Crone-Findlay, the brain behind the Tottie Talks Crafts Blog, shared a wonderful moment with us this week.

At the Deep Freeze Festival in Edmonton, she brought her Cricket to weave on. While she was weaving, a “youngster” came up to see what she was doing; he was enamored with the Cricket Loom and helped Noreen weave a bit.

You can find her post here, complete with a video clip of her weaving with the curious child.
It is always heartwarming to see the uninhibited awe of children. If more of us wove or spun in public, who knows how many children would pick it up and start weaving? With weaving becoming easier to “buy” into with great portable looms like the Cricket and School Loom, getting children interested in the craft is easier than ever.

We also loved seeing Noreen’s PAINTED Cricket and Cricket Stand in a lovely robin’s egg blue. Her post can be found here, along with a very informative video.

She mixed milk paint and applied three coats on the stand and her Cricket Loom, while lightly sanding between coats to get excellent adhesion. For extra durability she used a clear coat of varathane.

Noreen Weaves on her newly painted Cricket loom and Cricket Stand

I asked her for some thoughts on weaving and going to fairs. Here’s her reply:

People are enchanted by seeing a weaver at work.  They love the small size of the Cricket and are not intimidated by it. At every event, I have at least two people say to me: “My grandmother/auntie/mother used to have a HUGE loom that she wove blankets (etc.) on, but I was scared of it, it seemed too complicated.Small looms, like the Cricket, are inviting, and people, especially children, are happy to give it a try. They are amazed to learn that I make shirts, vests, dresses, stoles, shawls and other full size garments with the Cricket and other small looms. They assume that a small loom only allows you to weave small things. But, humanity has been weaving on narrow looms for hundreds and hundreds of years. Kimono looms were only 12 inches wide, and Kente looms are only a few inches wide. Seams! Needle and thread are magical things!

 Thank you to Noreen for sharing this wonderful project and story with us!

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Benjamin Krudwig

Benjamin is the Content Manager at Schacht, and loves creating weaving and spinning content for the Schacht blog. His other spinning and weaving work can be seen in Handwoven, Spin-Off and the SIP Easy Weaving With Little Looms. You may find him on Instagram as @benjamin_krudwig